How to make 220v outlet?

How to make 220v out of 110v? 220v suppose to be better for welding right?

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Old King wrote:

Power delivered (ignoring those nasty losses) is volts times amps. If you need 110 watts in the welder, its 110V x 1A, or 220V x 0.5A. For the same power delivered your 220v wiring only has to carry 1/2 the current that 110v wiring does. For the same gauge wire you can provide twice the "power" from a 220 v circuit that you can from a 110v circuit. 220v wiring allows lighter gauge and/or longer wire and/or more power. This is a very simple explaination, and I'm sure to get a flamed for it, but that's the gist of it.
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If you really don't understand, please call an electrician to do this.

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On 10 Nov 2004 15:18:11 -0800, the renowned snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Old King) wrote:

Since you're on aol, I'll assume you're in the US and are talking about a residence. In the US and Canada, there is usually 240V present at the service box in stand-alone homes. There are two 120V 60Hz circuits (center-tapped 240V) and a neutral. Heavy appliances like electric dryers and electric water heaters are wired in to the 240V or connected with a big plug in the case of the dryer. Apartments and commercial buildings often have 208 rather than 240 because they are fed from 3-phase. (sqrt(3)*120 = 208).
L1 --------------------- <---x <---------x | | 120VAC | | N -------------------------- <---x 240VAC | 120VAC | | | L2---------------------- <---x <---------x
It's safe and feasible to install a 240V outlet in such a place, but I'll let someone else answer on electrical code issues.
For myself (and not necessarily to code), I just added an appropriately rated double breaker to the box, ran some appropriate size wire (sweaty work, 'cause it's thick) and a dryer-style outlet.
If all you really have is 120, you can use a transformer, but it's big and heavy and maybe expensive, and the input side draws twice the current of the output side.
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
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