Wood working mitersaw for cutting steel?

I was wondering if I could also use my Delta Wood working miter saw for
cutting steel tubing?
I am planing on cutting some 1x1 and or 2x2 x1/8 tubing and of coarse
flat stock for a door for my wifes tack shed. Would a wood working
miter saw be able to keep up or would it break down?
I am still going to see what I can do with the 4x8 HF metal bandsaw or
chook up some cash flow for a cold saw in time.
Time and money in an hobby shop if hard to get.
Don D.
Reply to
pegleg
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You can use a suitable metal cutting abrasive saw blade in your miter saw, it will cut thin tubing nicely. Cut the flat stock with the thin edge up.
The downside is that this is a nasty process. The grit is a fire hazzard so make sure that you take the cloth bag off, clean out all the sawdust from the dust passages. Run this outside, wear goggles, ear plugs are a good thought. Clamp the metal in place with a 'C' clamp, if the stock shifts you can shatter the blade. If you plan more than a dozen or two cuts, get a 14" chop saw. The grit from the abrasive blade will tear up the bearings on your miter box.
Take a look at these: Either one would serve you well
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?Itemnumber=47840 pegleg wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
The 10" abrasive blades have compatable arbors, usually 5/8" with an adaptor. You need to go to the larger ones before the sizes change.
Bulletsnbra> It might work...
Reply to
RoyJ
A lot of 12" miter saws have 5/8" arbors too . And a washer to adapt a blade with a larger hole to said arbor . Dewalt is one , Makita too , from what we use in the cabinet shop . We have one of each (10" and a 12" not those particular brands) set up with fiber wheels for "special materials" . I keep telling them that a fine tooth carbide blade is better for the aluminum angle they're cutting , and those fiber blades are for FERROUS metals ... But they just keep on loading them up and tossing them . Keeps me in wheels ...
Reply to
Snag
It'll will probably do the job but is very hard on the saw. I tried using my miter saw on steel once. The sparks melted the elbow on the dust discharge . Chop saws are cheap From HF. Tom
Reply to
Tom Wait
You probably want to keep getting the left over fiber wheels.
If you want to be a hero, suggest they buy a steel cutting carbide blade. These blades are made by Morse, DML, Tenryu, and others. Cuts aluminum, steel angle iron, steel plate, et.al, and even put a pretty nice cut on wood. They work best in a dedicated saw which turns a bit slower, but you can get a lot of miles out of a 7 1/4" or other 5/8 hole blade. ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net
Reply to
DanG
I guess I do not wont to ruen my wood mitersaw so iwill think about the metal chop saw or work on the band saw to get that to cut straighter.
Thanks for all the input guys.
Don D.
pegleg wrote:
Reply to
pegleg
We have a 12" Makita miter saw set up with a carbide tipped blade designed for cutting Non-ferrous metals, special tooth geometry, works like a charm on Aluminium. Will cut wood quite well if you don't want take the time to swap back to the wood blade, I think it is a Freud product, but not sure. The labels wore off 3 years and a few sharpenings ago.
Stuart
Reply to
Stuart Wheaton
IIRC the difference in metal/plastic and wood blades is in the tooth rake . Neutral or negative for non-ferrous , positive for wood . I cut the top off of an aluminum drink can on the chopsaw in my bay today - *cleanly* . Folded the edge down about 1/8" and used it to mix some wood putty to match the "Steamed European Beech" I'm working . Then taped over the sharp edges of the top for a lid .
Reply to
Snag

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