Air brushing real car

I recently prepared paint damaged spots (sanded & primered) on my old
car and would like to air brush those spots. I've had experience years
ago air brushing wooden ship models and still have my Paasche air
brush. What are the best temperatures and humidity? I'll be using
Delstar DTR600 Acrilic Enamel Reducer with associated yellow paint.
Thanks for any advice,
Don
Reply to
Baldy
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Don,
You would probably be better off buying a inexpensive "touch up" or "gravity feed" gun than trying to airbrush damaged paint on your car. These guns will deliver more paint than your airbrush can, and should make the job much easier.
Below are a few links to various inexpensive guns from Harbor Freight that should work. Check the guns requirements against your compressors specs to make sure that you have enough air for which ever gun that you plan to use.
One more thought.. I work in an industrial painting business, and it has been our experience that most yellows will require a base coat of white to look proper. Ask your paint supplier if the paint you have will require a white undercoat, if they aren't sure, test spray some bare metal, or primered bare metal with two or three coats of your yellow and see how the color comes out before spraying your car. If you have access to some white you might also shoot a test panel with white, let it dry and then spray it with two or three coats of yellow, and check that color against your car.
Touch Up
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Detail Gravity Feed
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Gravity Feed
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Hope this helps Ken
Reply to
Ken Barnes
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Thanks Ken, sound ideas. I'd seen the gravity feed guns, but didn't know anything about them. My compressor is capable of 150 psi, of course I won't use any more than is required for the gun. I'll order immediately. As for the primer, my paint supplier sold me a light grey after seeing the car and suggesting the paint.
I'm a bit confused with this group. I see you top post by when I clicked on reply it opened with this bottom post position.
Cheers, Don
Reply to
Baldy
"Baldy" wrote
What do you use to read the group?
I can assure you that using a non web based browser, most of the posts are bottom posts, as you saw them in your reply. My bet is that whatever you are using is doing it to you.
Reply to
Morgans
Don,
I use Outlook Express, and it opens a reply message in a top post position. To me that makes more sense. After all if you are reading a reply message you should have already read the previous messages, and shouldn't have to scroll through them again just to read the reply. If you are picking the thread up from the middle then you can scroll down to read the previous posts.
Some people in the newsgroups really don't like top posting. But hey, if it's from Microsoft, it must be right. ;-)
I've actually never have used a gravity feed gun, we usually use a pressure pot system because we shoot textured industrial finishes. However the siphon feed cup, or touch up guns, and the gravity feed guns seem to be used by a lot of automotive refinishers. Myself, I like the pressure pot systems regardless of if spraying smooth, or textured finishes.
Ken
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Reply to
Ken Barnes
Q. How can you tell if a vacuum cleaner is made by Microsoft?
A. It doesn't suck.
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Live and learn.
Reply to
mtngal
I've use the Harbor freight touch up gun Ken mentioned for repainting bumpers and it worked out very well. Being used to airbrushing, I was surprised by the amount of overspray. I would mask off 4 - 6 feet around the spot you are painting. Also, the gun is rated at 4 CFM and it will use every bit of it.
Good luck! Randy
Reply to
BCRandy
Thanks Randy, you saved me just in time. After all is considered (I already have a good air bursh in Paasche that I used for several years) I guess I'll stick with the one I have. My biggest spot is about 4" in diameter.
Reply to
Baldy
"Ken Barnes" wrote
Most replies are picking parts of a previous post to respond to, like this one. Then, it is important to not top post.
I don't know why your OE is doing that, because mine does not. I can't think of any setting that would make it do that. (top post automatically) Anyone got an idea about this one?
Not really a good reason, but if you say so!
I'll bet you are shooting large volumes, for long periods of time. For that, what you are using makes sense. A lot of finish is needed to fill the lines, and be picked up by the feed tube.
For small volumes, small gun product containers are good. Less waste, and less minimum needed to work the gun.
Gravity feed will feed to the last drop, literally. They are also less dependant of the correct viscosity of the material being sprayed. With siphon feed, there are all kinds of small problems that can lead to sporadic "spitting" of the gun. The gravity feed almost always is consistent, and very tolerant of different viscosities.
Also, I made up a couple 90 degree fittings between the gravity feed cup and the gun body, so I could always have the gravity feed cup vertical, and higher than the gun. I could slip the fittings around, and spay upside down, on vertical, horizontal, or wherever I wanted. The general idea is like some grease guns have out near the tip of the gun. I think you get the idea.
Get a small (around a pint) gravity feed, hopefully High Volume Low Pressure gun, and you will never regret it!
Reply to
Morgans
"Baldy" wrote
The conventional guns do have a lot of overspray. The HVLP guns do not.
You could have your good car parked in the garage a few feet away, and not have to worry about getting paint on it.
Reply to
Morgans
I use Sea Monkey (from Mozilla), and it allows the user to choose to reply at the top or bottom. You can even choose top posting for email replies and bottom for usenet, or vice versa if you want to.
Reply to
Robert Reynolds
I like the HTML editor, but I haven't tried a lot of different HTML editors. It's at least as good as the one attached to Outlook.
The rest of Sea Monkey is great as far as I'm concerned. The address book captures every address you write to in a special directory so you can look at them later if you need to dig something up. The Settings and Preferences menus are thorough and logical.
Reply to
Robert Reynolds

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