Electric to nitro conversion question Kyosho Spree

I have a Kyosho Spree electric 2 channel that I converted over to a 3 channel. I would like to install a nitro engine in her but I would
like to know what size engines would work and be safe ?? What size nitro engine is equal to the 380 that is installed in the Spree???
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| I have a Kyosho Spree electric 2 channel that I converted over to a 3 | channel. I would like to install a nitro engine in her but I would | like to know what size engines would work and be safe ?? What size | nitro engine is equal to the 380 that is installed in the Spree???
It's hard to be sure, but a Norvel 0.061 is probably pretty close (probably erring on the side of more power). With the lower weight (no big battery), it will probably perform even better than the electric motor. You could probably do a 0.09 easily enough, and that would have *plenty* of extra power.
I can't tell what the plane is covered with -- make sure it's fuel proof, and don't forget to fuel proof any exposed balsa. And beef up the firewall -- the stock firewall probably isn't going to handle a glow engine well.
It might require some weight to balance after the conversion -- you won't be able to really move the battery around like you could before. Well you can, but it's a lot smaller, so the effect is less.
Personally, I'd leave it electric. If you need more power, get more cells, a li-poly battery and/or a better motor ... but a glow engine could work too.
--
Doug McLaren, snipped-for-privacy@frenzy.com
The trouble with doing something right the first time is that nobody
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Iwould think that just about any glow engine would be vastly more powerful than a 380 electric. The Norvel will turn a 5X3 near 20K.
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Paul McIntosh
Desert Sky Model Aviation
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Paul McIntosh wrote:

So will a speed 400.
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Actually, I was a bit off. The Norvel will be closer to 30K. Many Cox engines will do 20K.
And a speed 400 is a bit more motor than the anemic 380s in the RTF planes.

powerful
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Paul McIntosh wrote:

Its the same motor actually.
But you need to drive it with a higher voltage pack.
I've got a mabuchi 380 aka speed 400 doing estimated 26k RPM. It would need a 5x3 to achieve 20k in direct drive - currently its deeply geared on an 8x6 doing maybe 6k RPM at the prop.
To do 25k you need a 'long can' 400. And maybe 16V or so. Or a brushless. So you are right that a stock 400 won't do 30k on a 5x3, but it will near as damn it do 20k.
Geared the way I have it, its producing as much thrust as the norvel, its only
downside is its pitch speed is around 50 mph rather than 70mph.
So it won't overtake you on a pylon circuit, but will climb just as well.

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The neat little Thunder Tiger GP.07 would be the best match. http://www.acehobby.co.nz/OSSB2/Root/OSSBEC1/ShowItem.asp?PID9981 Several of the TT ARF models and other Kyosho ARF models are flown locally with either the GP07 and or the geared 380/400 size motors with out any problems. regards Alan T. Alan's Hobby, Model & RC Links http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~atong / .............................................................

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Mike R. wrote:

Norvel 049 or thereabouts
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