Anvil repair?

I haven't done much with the forge in a while (only lit a fire once this year, to do some repair work), but a recently acquired anvil
has at least gotten me back into the shop. It's a 126 lb Mousehole that has definitely been exposed to weather and has a few small chunks (largest one can be covered by my thumb) missing from the edge of the workface. I'm still cleaning it up, but it looks like it might also have a problem with a few pits in the workface. No dead spots, and only one thin gouge in the horn. The table has seen a lot of use and is worn down a bit.
It's been a while since I've read anything on anvil repair, but I do have a few hardfacing rods. Do I have to build up a base with nickel rods first, before welding the workface, or is the nickel rod only used if I have to start building up from the core material?
--
Paul Stevens

Bill 'n' Opus in 2004
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On Sun, 26 Sep 2004 16:39:07 -0500, Paul Stevens wrote:

Just use the hardfacing sticks if you have enough. I think the standard sticks are only used for deep repairs for economy reasons.
--
BigEgg

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I use Stoody 1105 and 2110. Neither rod is cheap, especially since they come in 10 pound packs. You might compare their specs to other rods that you have. What you want is impact resistance, not wear resistance.
If you're down to the wrought body (which I think fits a Mousehole), the 2110 will crack when welded direct. Put down a layer of 1105 first, then top with 2110. If you try 2110 and it doesn't crack, you're probably fine (if it cracks, grind it off).
Procedure: Heat anvil to about 300F. Not crucial, 200F is probably fine, but don't go over 300 or the rest of the face will start losing its hardness. Power wire brush before welding, grinding until you have clean metal where necessary. Weld one layer, power wire brush, repeat. Grind some before you quit as it will show better if you have a big divot. Wrap the anvil in insulation at least over night (you can reheat to 300F if desired). The 2110 hardens (as much as it does) with work, so beat your anvil before grinding. Now do a lot of grinding.
Steve
Paul Stevens wrote:

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Nickle rod is if it is a cast iron anvil with a steel face and you are starting at the cast iron and building up.
A Mousehole anvil should be solid wrought iron with a steel face. The nickle shouldn't be necessary.
Don't get in a hurry. Hardface doesn't like being layed on too thick at once. peening the weld as it cools can reduce surface cracks, but most hardface will have microfractures in the surface. They are normal, and shouldn't cause problems.
Manganese hardfacing rod needs to be hammered a lot to really reach full hardness so hammer it before grinding it down.
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I was told that peening cast iron after welding can prevent cracking. Since the guy who told my has a bit of a reputation for blowing smoke out his ... I did not believe him. However I did tried this technique and it does appear to work. He also told me to use an air blower to cool the are around the weld while peening.
The questions I have is why does it work? and what is the correct techinque?
brad
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Peening the weld can prevent cracking when welding cast iron, and is an important part of the "cold weld with nickle" method. It may also work with other rod.
Why it works: peening the weld deposit allows it to stretch and fill in the space as the weld cools and shrinks.
The correct technique: Vee out the crack with a grinder. Lay in short beads (1/2 inch or so) and get the hammer on them while the bead is still red hot (don't fiddle about finding the hammer), and keep peening until it's cold. Space the individual beads out over the crack. If the item being welded starts to heat up, go off and have a cup of coffee, or lunch, or home for the day. Eventually you get the whole thing welded.
Other methods involve preheating and postheating. This can be difficult to do in most shops, for a variety of reasons.
--
Cats, Coffee, Chocolate...vices to live by

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brad wrote:

Who's talking about cast iron here? This thread is about repairing anvils! Anvils (unless they're of the paperweight or doorstop variety) are *not* made of cast iron!
GWE
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Sorry for my indiscretion ... the post I replied to talked about the peening technique and I felt that it also applied to areas other than anvil repair ... it will NEVER happen again I promise ;)
brad
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Vulcan anvils are steel face with a cast iron body. I've seen some fine smithin' done on a Vulcan Anvil. Welding on cast iron info would be appropriate if someone was repairing a Vulcan.

Since
...
around
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brad wrote:

Hot metal like water generates crystals as it cools. Crystal faces are crack zones. If one has a hot lump and keep the molecules moving then crystal faces are prevented or they are small and are not aligned with each other.
Similar concept when trying to de-magnetize some iron. Heat - to increase the action and thus the dipoles within have movement abilities, then bang on it as it cools and the dipoles are fixed in a random like fashion.
My bet - crystal faces.
Martin
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Martin Eastburn, Barbara Eastburn
@ home at Lion's Lair with our computer snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net
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Thanks for the replies. I'm fairly sure I've got enough hardfacing rods to completely fill the the missing chunks, and I don't think the damage goes any deeper than the workface.
Still a lot of rust to remove. :(
--
Paul Stevens

Bill 'n' Opus in 2004
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I remember when the welders on the railroad got new orders on how to build up a battered frog point ('77?). The new orders said thay had to put down a foundation (pad?) of gas welded rod (4340?) before laying down the arc deposited hard facing. What happened was some of the welders were having the whole arc-welded works popping out. The welder I knew so well and explained it to me wasn't having that problem but switched methods anyway. :) He didn't care, it was all the same to him, as long as what he did was the best he could do. :)
Ok, so it might not have anything to do with anvils but there it is anyhow. ;)
Alvin in AZ (don't -know- nothin about any of it really) ps- I have one of the 1/4" thick "gas frog point" welding rods I'll spark test it more carefully and report back
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