Cleaning up anvil repair

I was given an anvil about 10 years ago which was badly swaybacked and gouged up and so I built it back up with hardfacing rod. I was able to
clamp some aluminum to the sides of the face so that I could run the bead right up to the edge, but my attempts to put some sort of backing into the hardy and pritchel holes was a flop Now there is some overflow into both of them. I recently got back into the fire after perhaps 6 or 8 years a few weeks ago and remembered how much I loved it. Now I'd like to dress those holes if I can. McMaster-Carr sells a 1/8" shank cubic boron nitride grinding bit for hard metals which are suitable for my dremel tool. However, it recommends a sulpho-chlorinated oil coolant. Since I am not going to be able to flood the workpiece, how should I proceed? Drip a little on, grind a little, rinse, lather, repeat? What is a good brand of coolant to use here? Do I also need to wear a respirator in addition to safety glasses?
Thanks for your help, Rob
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A Dremel tool will be pretty slow. If you use it too hard, it may burn out. A good tool for this is a die grinder. You can get air or electric. I've never used anything like a boron nitride tool, I've just used standard abrasives. It does take a lot of grinding. I definitely recommend a dust mask.
Steve
Rob wrote:

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I suggest you post this question to rec.crafts.metalworking
A guy who is good with a cutting torch could trim those holes pretty neatly.
Pete Stanaitis ------------------
Rob wrote:

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spaco wrote:

I did the hardfacing in a couple of welding classes I took at the local community college. At one point, the instructor was demonstrating air-arc gouging and trimmed up the hardie hole for me. However, he trimmed it too far back and then I added too much hard facing. I have a cutting torch, but I don't feel like i am steady enough to avoid cutting something I don't want to. The dremel tool should be a little more finely controllable. I don't have a lot of material to remove.
I will post this to r.c.m, though.
Thanks for your help, Rob
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If your Hardie is 1" or larger, you might want to consider one of the 1" belt "files" for the job since it could help with the squaring of the hole as well as maintaining flat sides.
The Dremel will be facing 2 problems:
    1. Depth: few burrs are long enough to reach all the way through     2. Taper: it's a bear to maintain any taper with a rotary tool
Of course, if you want to take the time, there's always the old-fashioned file...
BTW, I've been known to wear out all kinds of rotary tools...
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The hardie is only about 3/4" (it's only a 70# anvil). A cross section of the horn looks like this:
face __________ ___________ _) (_ | | | | | hardie | hole
I just have to grind off that little overhang around the hole.
Thanks for your help, Rob
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48g2000cwx.googlegroups.com:

hole
through
fashioned
If you have any Carbide or Diamond bits for that Dremel, I'd suggest trying one of them before plunking down a lot of money for a specialty bit.
One of the best buys I've run across on Diamond Burrs [1/8" shank] has been from Homier [sp?]. Others, including Harbor Freight, also have good deals.
Under $10 for 50 assorted shapes.
You might also want to try using some of the cutoff wheels on the hardie hole.
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I got some 'sperience with BC... it's "crumbly" stuff like SiC. It smells like SiC only stronger and sharper and-so stinkier. ;) Other than that, you won't notice much difference in the two.
I used BC for smoothing up AlOx-ceramic-hones that SiC had a really hard time "touching" but no metal will need anything harder than SiC and I'll betcha AlOx would kick SiC's butt in this case since its way-tougher and harder than any "steel".
I gotta ask, because you didn't say... a -new- file under lots of presure won't "catch" your hard facing? BTDT with my heat and cold treated knife blades, files slide right over my 66+hrc 1095 but not familiar with hardfacing, let alone the type of hardfacing rod you used (and didn't mention BTW;).
Could you do your homework;) and research the rod you used and post its laid-down hardness levels?
File teeth ~= 67hrc and needs something under 63 hrc for it to be able to "catch it" at all and then under the best situation.
Alvin in AZ (hardness freak)
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snipped-for-privacy@XX.com wrote:

Well, I took a couple of welding classes at the local community college about a year or two apart. In the first class, I put down one pass of Lincoln MM rod. In the second class, I put down a layer of Ranite BX (I think). I tried cleaning up the hole with a die grinder bit I got at the hardware store, but it and several others glazed up almost immediately. The bit in question costs $4 - $12 dollars. A poster on r.c.m advised to treat the point with a dressing stone frequently as I try to grind away the unwanted hard facing.
Thanks, Rob
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Couldn't you just hit it with a torch and heat it until the hardness get to ~40 R and just take an aggressive file to it?
snipped-for-privacy@XX.com wrote:

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From the original post, I got the feeling that he doesn't have anything besides a Dremel to work with.
But, I've been wrong before...
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RAM wrote:

I have a dremel and a O/A torch, but I don't want to use the latter because I am worried about removing more than I want to. I had done the same thing before and my instructor cut it back with an air-arc gouger, but then I messed it up again and I didn't want to try gouging it myself and I made no progress with a die grinder.
Thanks, Rob
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If you haven't already done so, try using Diamond burrs with only light pressure.
While progress may be slow, I haven't found much that a Diamond won't handle. [I've often used them to sharpen hardened steel.]
BTW, I ran across some $10 imitation Dremels at Wal-Mart that came in a nice aluminum case that also contained over a dozen diamond burrs and over a half- dozen green Silicon grinding points.
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I found I nice 1/8" shank WC dremel bit at Home Depot for $8 which is working, albeit a bit slowly. I am suprised WC would cut hardfacing though. I figured you would need diamond or some kind of oxide. As I said, some pink die grinder bits I used in a shop class glazed up in a few seconds.
Thanks for your help, Rob
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Rob,
I sure hoppe your "hard facing" rod is of the "machineable" variety. Otherwise you are in for a hell of a time no matter what type of bit you use. Also, 1/8" shank tools will not stand up to the job you are trying to do. Make it a 1/4"shank double cut-carbide burr, in a die grinder at 30,000rpm. If the hard face is the "non-machineable" flavor you will need some hard ass abrasive points and a whole lot of time.
Rob wrote:

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OK, here's an idea which I have no idea if it will work: heat the metal to be removed with a torch, and with it still glowing, chip it off with a cold chisel (preferably not your best one, in case you kill the temper in the process). Quench the chisel often. My worry is that the hardfacing will be too tough to chisel even when heated. If it were mild steel, I'd even try it cold... --Glenn Lyford
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