Dump Truck repair

I've been asked to repair the main hinge on an old dump truck where the
holes are nearly worn through.
Here are some pictures:
formatting link

The round bar that the bed hinges on is 1-1/2 inch diameter.
The four "ears" are 3 inches tall, 4 inches long, and 7/16 inch thick.
I have some 1/2 inch plate that I can cut some new "ears" out of. It doesn't
really look like the extra 1/16th inch is going to hurt.
Either the original setup did not have any bushings/bearings, or they are
long gone!
Here's my plan:
1. Cut the ears out of my plate with 45 degree bevels along the weld sides.
2. Take them to a machine shop to have the 1-1/2 inch diameter holes milled.
3. Have machine shop include brass bushings or not?
4. With new ears in hand, cut out old ears using my torch. Grind smooth.
5. Grab my welding machine and glue the new ones in place with 1/8th inch
6011 SMAW.
I'll need to make more passes than the original single pass weld when it was
manufactured, but it should be plenty strong.
Comments?
Suggestions?
I want to make sure I have considered all options before I cut these ears
off.
Thanks!
Joe
Reply to
jp2express
Loading thread data ...
Damn!
Sorry about that, but the links are slightly off.
Please replace "/VolvoEars/" with "/photos/VolvoEars/" and they should come up.
Lordy! How embarrassing!
Again, my apologies! ~Joe
formatting link
formatting link
formatting link
formatting link
formatting link
formatting link
Reply to
jp2express
These pages do not work for me.
i The page you tried to access does not exist on this server. This page may not exist due to the following reasons:
1. You are the owner of this web site and you have not uploaded (or incorrectly uploaded) your web site. For information on uploading your web site using FTP client software or web design software, click here for FTP Upload Information.
2. The URL that you have entered in your browser is incorrect. Please re-enter the URL and try again.
3. The Link that you clicked on incorrectly points to this page. Please contact the owner of this web site to inform them of this situation.
Reply to
Ignoramus22010
Yeah, I posted a reply about 15 minutes later (had to give the message board time for the new post to arrive before I was able to test my links).
Here are the corrected links as I "reposted" shortly after:
--- "Joe" reposted with this: Damn!
Sorry about that, but the links are slightly off.
Please replace "/VolvoEars/" with "/photos/VolvoEars/" and they should come up.
Lordy! How embarrassing!
Again, my apologies! ~Joe
formatting link
formatting link
formatting link
formatting link
formatting link
formatting link

"Ignoramus22010" wrote:
Reply to
jp2express
I went to high school with a guy that was crushed to death by the bed of a dump truck. He was in the same general area as the guy topping off fluid in the first pic. Hydros cut loose & that was it.
Be careful.
Reply to
John L. Weatherly
Joe- not so much advice, but can you answer a few questions for my own reference?
1. Is the ear surface is way too far gone to repair with hardfacing?
2. how true is the subframe the ears mount to? if it's twisted in any way it seems like it could be a serious pain to get the pin back in the right place.
3. how tight is the tolerance between the pin and the bore of the ear?
Is torching out 4 new ears that have to be milled to a common center going to be difficult? (i know it would be for me, but I'm not the best guy with a torch either)
thanks for the info, and good luck on the repair.
Reply to
utahparx
If I was going to go through replacing the ears I would replace them with hardened bushings and pins or something greaseable. Brass would wear out in no time. I would also use low hydrogen electrodes such as 7018. Tell that guy he needs to throw a chock between the body and frame when he does that!
Reply to
rustyjames
"utahparx" asks:
Well, I have some hardfacing rods, but I'd think it would be more work trying to build up the insides where it is all worn. I'd have to remove the pin first, then weld around and around over and over inside the hole where the pin goes. Then, if I built up too much, I'd have a really hard time trying to get the extra hardfacing metal back off!
See? There's something I hadn't thought of. The subframe (either on the truck itself or on the dump bed ...or both) could be very twisted! This driver has some pretty beat up equipment, so it would not surprise me at all!
I don't know. Right now, the bore is so "wallered out" (East Texas term) that I can stick my fat thumb in the hole. Even if the new ears are bored a 1/16th of an inch too big, it is still a huge improvement over what he has now.
Well, I haven't talked to the machine shop yet. That's a good question for me to ask them, though! Thanks!
Reply to
jp2express
What about just boring some holes the size you want them in new ears, grinding the old ears flat, and just clamp the new ears over the old and fillet weld around the edges?
GWE
jp2express wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Greetings all,
My only suggestion would be that when you begin to replace the ears, do so with the hinge pin run through them. I realize this may be cumbersome, may want to have some help around, but it will help insure that everything is aligned properly. Nothing worse than getting everything welded up and the #$^@#^ pin won't go back in. You can cover the pin with Anti Spatter spray or old cardboard or tin to protect it.
Just my $.02, Jim C Roberts
Reply to
Jim C Roberts
Good advice is sometimes hard to find, if you don't get any you might try the following: Position the dump on the subframe where you want it to be and weld it in place, cut out origional ears and make new ones from AR plate. Position the new ear and mark for drilling. Ears may vary from one side to the other so don't weld them together and drill without checking. A long pin is better for alignmnet. Bevel new ears and make full penetration welds with new 7018 rods if you don't a rod oven, preheat ends of subframe to help eliminate hydrogen craking. HTH
Reply to
Surfin'
Good advice!
What's AR plate? Plate from Arkansas isn't any different than Texas plate, is it? LOL
Seriously, I'm not sure what the AR means.
I'm going to need to make multiple passes. I was planning on using 6011 for the root (just because I personally find it easier to control), clean up as best I can, then hit it with the 7018.
I like 7018 for its tensile strength, but I hate the fact that it is higher maintenance to store. Since I don't have an oven, than means I've got to run out and buy a small 5-lb box of rods whenever something comes along that needs it. On the other hand, my 6011 rods get wet from me keeping them stuffed in my carpenter pants' cargo pocket, they get rained on (hopefully not that often), and might just sit on my shelf for months before I get to them. As long as they are dry when I fire up the Lincoln, they still burn great. I'd like to see a 7011 or 8011 rod.
"Surf> Good advice is sometimes hard to find, if you don't get any you might try
formatting link
formatting link
formatting link
formatting link
formatting link
formatting link
Reply to
jp2express
That's about what I'm planning, but I'll cut the old ears out with the torch and grind the leftover crud.
Thanks for the 2 cents!
"Grant Erw> What about just boring some holes the size you want them in new ears, > grinding
Reply to
jp2express
Thanks Mr. Roberts!
I probably would have kept the pin in while welding the new ears on (because it seems like the logical thing to do), but you never know what happens when you get in the middle of something.
I hadn't specifically planned on keeping the pin in, so you spelling it out for me should ensure that I do it.
If I get enough 2 cents from everyone, I won't even need to weld anymore! :)
"Jim C Roberts" wrote:
Reply to
jp2express
Abrasion Resistant Plate. Used for dump truck beds.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
T1 high tensile steel is often used for crane and trailer frames and requires 11018 for proper welding. It is also very resistant to abrasion and is often used as a substitute for true AR plate.
The photos do not show the amount of wear in the center part of the hinge attached to the box. I suspect that the pin should be restrained from turning in the subframe and that the center part should be bushed and lubricated.
Please add my voice to those who have commented on the shocking absence of safe working procedure shown in your first photo. This would cause an immediate safety investigation, lots of paperwork and meetings, and probably the firing of the worker or foreman or both on any of the jobs I work on. It is a classic example of inadequate training and poor safety management, I bet if you looked around this operation that you will find many other examples. Be very careful working around these guys, treat them all as if they are trying to kill you and make it look like an accident.
As welders, we often work under heavy objects and it is our first and most important responsibility to ensure that any such object is secured to proper safety standards. IMHO a block of wood jammed in the hinge is NOT adequate for proper safety standards.
'If you think that safety is too expensive or time consuming, just try having an accident.'
Reply to
Private
The guy in the pic is an independent trucker, and he is the owner of the truck.
What is worse is he was having to fill the hydraulic reservoir because the cylinder is leaking so bad that there was only enough fluid to raise the bed to where it is shown in the picture!
These guys know nothing about safety, and do not carry any type of insurance (liability on the trucks). I certainly know to watch my back around them.
somebody wrote:
Reply to
jp2express
Alloy & Abrasion Resistant plate. AR400F as an example.
Not pushing this company or such - have their stuff and it works.
formatting link
We shoot at AR plate. Min spec is 360 (BHN) to 400. .308 demands 500F and when one puts a 30-06 into a pistol - wow anyway!
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Endowment Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member.
formatting link

jp2express wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
anyway!
How does that stuff stand up to welding? I see it is through hardened, does the welding take it back to the softer state?
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
Often noted as T1 armor plate
Gunner
This Message is guaranteed environmentally friendly Manufactured with 10% post consumer ASCII Meets all EPA regulations for clean air Using only naturally occuring fibers Use the Message with confidance. (Some settling may occure in transit.) (Best if Used before May 13, 2009)
Reply to
Gunner

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.