Burner adjustment

As the rigidizer dries in my first forge, I am anticipating about adjusting the Zoeller sidedraft propane burner. Seems like there are alot of
variables, but Mr. Zoeller did mention the 'sound'. Besides locating the burner flare on the 3/4" (1-1/4" to 1-1/2") pipe, there is the location (3/8", half the pipe inside diameter?) of the orifice to the pipe inlet, the fuel pressure (8 lbs?) , and the draft damper setting. . . . .I'm hoping the burner 'talks' to one, when it is tuned and working properly. I assume getting a neutral flame can have alot of variables too. Sounds like a rookie has to jump in with both feet and test all the possibilities.
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theChas. wrote:

The sound is more of a consistent flow from a gentle hiss to a full on roar. If you hear a spluttering sound then you have to adjust the gas.
I made a forge for my friend, he was in a rush so didn't stick around for a lesson in tuning. When asking him how he found the forge he stated that it was spluttering, so I walked him through the tuning process. He was fine after that :-)
Regards Charles
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There is a difference between amount of heat, and peak temp.
Think of a one-gallon bucket of hot water, say 140 F. And a five gallon bucket of water at the same temp. Same temp, but the five gallon bucket will melt more ice -- more volume of heat.
The sound is directly related to amount of heat, the amount of fuel burning. The shape and color of the flame is a fair indicator of peak temperature, how hot the flame is at the hottest. You adjust the shape of the flame, the blue cone in the middle, to correctly observe whether there is enough air to burn all the fuel cleanly (neutral flame), too much air (oxidizing flame), or insufficient air. Sometimes you want an oxidizing flame when you want to reduce rust or carbon, sometimes you want to affect carbon less in the forge. You will want to notice how different materials work in neutral, oxydizing, or other flames (the adjustment will be subtle, you don't want a *lot* of extra or insufficient air), Adjust the placement of the flare, the orifice/nozzle tip placement for this, and to some extent the air path. You shouldn't have to make much change as the amount of fuel is increased or decreased (at least, if you aren't near the max or min limits for the burner).
When running, the flame will make a roaring sound, This will be related to the amount of fuel burning. The volume of heat. The temperature will be related to the type of fuel you burn, oxygen content of the air (usually pretty consistent!), and ratio of oxygen (air) to fuel -- the shape of the flame.
Any burner will have a maximum limit to how much air and fuel can be combined. Usually we can increase fuel pressure past the amount of air we can provide to the flame, which is why forced-air burners were developed in the first place. Many of us have returned our interest to naturally aspirated (Zoeller, Ron Reil, etc) burners. There are different sizes for different volume capacities. On the low end, getting a very small amount of heat is as much a matter of design as the max amount. The flared nozzle is one of the key parts for good operation full-bore and cranked down. One innovation I liked on the Ron Reil pages was a split fuel line. One side had a valve ro adjusting the full-bore flame, I think a ball valve. The other side had needle valve, sort of a 'pilot' setting at the lowest amount of fuel that would sustain a flame. The larger valve could them be shut off between heats, but the forge would stay hot on a minimum flame. And you wouldn't have to re-light.
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