cutting edge insert

I don't see why a piece of a file or rasp would not work if it is inset into the edge of a woodworking tool, so that the cutting edge can be heat treated
to make it hold an edge. . . . Anyone have any suggestions about this?. . .thanks . . . chas
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On Friday, February 15, 2013 5:56:36 PM UTC-5, chas wrote:

nto

ted

I've not heard of files being used for this, but it's certainly possible th at it has been done.
I will caution you to try to find older files for this. It is my understan ding that older files were high carbon, but that newer ones are case harden ed lower carbon steel. Sorry, I don't have any idea of when the changeover happened. It might be better to chase down a piece of something known to have a higher carbon content, like O1 or OCS (old car spring).
You could edge a lot of woodworking tools with a coil or leaf spring.
--Glenn Lyford
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On Friday, February 15, 2013 5:56:36 PM UTC-5, chas wrote:

I've not heard of files being used for this, but it's certainly possible that it has been done.
I will caution you to try to find older files for this. It is my understanding that older files were high carbon, but that newer ones are case hardened lower carbon steel. Sorry, I don't have any idea of when the changeover happened. It might be better to chase down a piece of something known to have a higher carbon content, like O1 or OCS (old car spring).
You could edge a lot of woodworking tools with a coil or leaf spring.
--Glenn Lyford *************** Thanks for the reply. A book I have says that OCS can only be made so hard and then one needs to put in a high carbon steel for the cutting edge, especially for wood mechanics. I'm in luck as I have some big files and rasps from the '30's and '40's. . . . . .I bought an imported steel Chinese cleaver 40 years ago that one could still see the teeth from the file where it had been reworked flat. It took one hell of an edge. . . . . newer SS ones are nice and don't rust but they don't come close to taking such an edge. . . .chas . ***************
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Danggit, stop guessing, learn how to spark test your stuff! :)
All you really need are "known samples" and a little patience. McMaster-Carr etc has drill rod made from various tool steels.
What you'll find in ASM's books is something simply called... "1.22% carbon steel" ...it's used for all sorts of stuff and one of those is files...
http://www.panix.com/~alvinj/testsamples.htm
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Also BTW, "OCS" can be made from any of a couple dozen low-alloy medium-carbon steels. I read a book on it. ;) They listed a dozen that were being commonly used at the time. For a blacksmith and "eyeball-it heat-treater" the exact alloy isn't that important just know it'll act like and get about as hard as 5160.
RR car springs are claimed to be cheaper 1070 according to what I'd read but wouldn't surprise me if it wasn't the same as RR rail which is extra clean 1075-1078.
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The photos and line drawings of sparks thrown as a method to learn spark testing is a waste of time, IME. All you need are some known samples and get with it. :)
You can do this, it ain't hard to learn, lets hear back what you fiNgure out about it as you go. We'll all learn a little.
You game? :)
Alvin in AZ
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