dismounting a peened tang

Charly the Bastard wrote:


You could probably choose an appropriate section of the tang and draw it out a little and get your protrusion that way. BTDT. Check for hardness first.
In the extreme case, modern-weld an extension onto the tang.
-- Carl West snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net http://carl.west.home.comcast.net
>>>>>>>> change the 'DOT' to '.' to email me <<<<<<<<<<<<
"Clutter"? This is an object-rich environment.
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I'll take your word for it- I sure couldn't do it, and I've never seen a blade like it. is there any other way the billet could be made?
thanks,
carl

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caterbro wrote:

Probably, but this way would support the elongation of the inserts, and it would be the simplist and easiest construction. Blacksmiths are a lazy lot, the fewer hammer blows in the heat, the better.
Charly
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Charles, From a historical perspective, I have never seen or heard of a technique supporting your theory of construction:
<<"Take a short fat block of base and beat cylinders of high chrome into the sides, like weiners in a package">>
Given how compulsive oriental smiths are about following accepted techniques and traditions also makes your theory dubious. Furthermore, a blade with a solid hard core supported by outer scales of softer metal would be structurally better than a soft bar with inserts of harder material. That's they way I see's it anyway.
Glen G.
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glen wrote:

Well Glen, you come up with a viable construction technique that matches what we're looking at in the fotos. No one has even determined the age of this piece with any certainty, it could be up to 1000 years old and you wouldn't be able to tell from a foto on the Web. Or it could be made last week. I looked at the fotos, and this was the answer that the Engineer came up with. I know the technique works, that of dimensional transformation, and it explains the welds and the elongation of the inserts. I've seen that silver flash before, usually in +1% chrome alloys, and the darker substrate screams carbon steel. Since the fotos appear to indicate a flush surface bevel, it would be damn hard to incise scallops to reveal half oval inserts during fabrication, so that pretty much eliminates a hard core with a side panel sandwich, unless the sides were pre cut to shape, and then there'd still be distortion during welding. My way is easier, time is money. And... a hard core is more prone to failure under bending force than a soft core. Granted, the yield point will be higher, but hard things shatter where soft things bend.
Charly
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Guy's, Wish we had some cross sectional photo micrographs eh. Carls photo's were a bit fuzzy and the color was off and that makes surveying a crap shoot at best? And what do I know, I'm just a dumb ass smith. The "incising" to create the scalloped pattern would be done cold Charly. It's really not that difficult just time consuming.
Hey Carl, why don't you hack off a 1/2" or so of the blade tip and I'll send it to my buddies at Carnegie Mellon. Just kidding! What is life without some mysteries, eh?
Glen
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nah- you want the give in the middle, so it's doesn't shatter. the edges were, AFAIK, the harder steel in these swords, some examples have complex temper lines, some have inserted hard steel edges, some have both.
after all, it's a sword- the edges need to take the abuse and do the cutting, and the body needs to absorb the shock.
carl
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So guy's, Is this thread dead? Seems like we had a lively thing going here. Oh, i get it, everyone is too busy in the shop to be e-mailing....................right?
GG
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glen wrote:

I see only you on this one. Take care. Maybe they are watching Baseball or something. Hum - maybe hundred or so weddings around a anvil :-)
Best Regards, Martin
--
Martin Eastburn, Barbara Eastburn
@ home at Lion's Lair with our computer snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net
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On 9 Oct 2004 12:47:12 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com (caterbro) wrote:

What age ? Got any pictures ?

If it's Boxer or earlier, that's not (IMHO) enough reason to strip it. Stripping Chinese swords is easy, but it is destructive.
--
Smert' spamionam

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indeed: http://photobucket.com/albums/v321/caterbro/heavy%20jian /

I ballpark it as warlords era or post WWII, but that a wild guess, mostly. often, the furniture is replaced on an older blade, so it's very rare to stumble across a 100% genuine, complete sword- that might be the case here, but I think that the fullers were ground out with a wheel, which points to younger rather than older. the brass and woodwork is better than average, but not all that special. also, the tip is chipped and needs some shaping.
it ain't no chinesearms or huang chao dynasty blade, but it's a interesting piece for the money and will doubtless be a good sword.
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