Best Al cutting solution..



The last one we tried, from Sumitomo, was about double that of PCD. The test wasn't very productive in that the tool life was just slightly more than PCD, but not enough to justify the cost. The geometry of the tool didn't lend itself easily to a monocrystal design. In other applications, it would have probably been great.

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Anthony

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Bryce, Here is where you make your tool vendor applications people earn the check they back up to every week. I learned this the hard way..trying to do testing and keep up with all the production stuff, plus the project stuff. Worked myself nearly to death. Now...I give them specific criteria to meet, generally I will set the bar a bit higher than what I can really live with, just to see if they can meet it, which is a plus and added value on the productivity side if they do. Just write out specifically what you need for the application, invite a few in for an hour and lay it out. Make them meet your criteria as best they can. Invest as little time as you can afford, meaning let them keep up with all the paperwork, other than maybe putting a tool tracking sheet on the machine for the guys to jot down dates and pieces produced and reason for change. Let the tool applications people put it in a db and decypher the data and present you the reports along with recommendations. That is what they are getting paid to do...You aren't.
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Anthony

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We've begun using pcd endmill on some of our products for this exact reason...(needing a crisp, sharp edge--with absolutly no discernable raised burr).
No other tooling holds up even near as long over the long haul.
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On Thu, 13 Jul 2006 22:08:16 -0700, "PrecisionMachinisT"

Hi Sam, do you mind sharing where you get them from, and a few pointers for anybody thinking of purchasing PCD end mills? It's so much easier to learn from others' experiences than to create your own. You getting around much, or how's the recovery?
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Bryce

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No other tooling holds up even near as long over the long haul.

Bryce, What deepth/dia do you need to mill? There are a few designs we use also.
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wrote:

Oh, I don't necessarily have an application off the top of my head, but we do make a lot of cosmetic surfaces with a 1/2" dia. x 3/4" length end mill. Usually finishing a profile just over 1/2" deep or so. Sometimes we rough and finish with the same tool, sometimes we use two tools. 6061-T6 AL in wrought condition, either round bar or rec. bar.
We haven't done a lot of production milling in the past, but it has been picking up a lot lately. We have a Mori NH4000 that has a 14K spindle, and is one year old now. That should push a PCD end mill fairly well I would hope.
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Bryce

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I'll admit, most of what we use is custom stuff. However, since you use such short tooling, it would be relatively cheap. The cost is in the carbide, not in the diamond. My suggestion would be a 2-flute, straight flute carbide shank EM with PCD, since you may need to go 3/4" deep. You can have a 5-7 rake on the flutes to help with chip evac, and still have decent support on the cutting edge. More than that and your relief angles on the flute faces get too sharp and the edge has little support. This will reduce your tool life. Normally, you can single pass with PCD, provided you have the appropriate cutter diameter. Get in touch with Citco. See the following links: http://www.citcodiamond.com/round.htm http://www.citcodiamond.com/cutting/standardproducts.htm http://www.citcodiamond.com/cutting/dipaxpcd.htm
These are good folks, and provide a good product.
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wrote:

raised
Hi Bryce,
Almost missed this one....these endmills were manufacturer samples, SP3 but as time progresses will probly integrate more into our programs.

Doing exceptionally well, thx.
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Does "crusty curmudgeon" equal "Grouchy old bastard"? If so, I resemble that remark.
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Hanita has some FAQ type info here that you might find useful:
http://www.hanita.com/hanita_protected/techinfo_start.htm
A friend has been using roughing end mills with his manual mill on aluminum recently and has been pleased with how quickly they work compared to standard end mills.
BTW, I'm planning on ordering a Tormach mill soon myself. Did you get the Tormach stand with flood coolant pump? That might help if you need to remove a lot of material.
Mike
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I used to have an aluminum part I would in batches on a cnc knee mill with a 2 hp motor. It had a 2" wide x 1" deep slot 11" long down the middle. What got me the most metal removal for the money, using a clamp on amp meter to max out the motor current, was a standard 3/4" ferrous rougher. I ran it at about 2700 rpm with a variable speed belt drive. That gave me a good torque match for the motor and with flood coolant blasting the chips out of the way it did amazingly well. Without flood coolant or air blast to remove the chips you really slow down from recutting the chips. I also tried a Hanita aluminum rougher in the same size. It didn't work as well. It was easy to tell that if I had the horsepower and rpms it would have been a great choice. However the standard fine pitch rougher did a better job with the low horsepower.
Gary H. Lucas
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Thanks for that - it could come in useful. My only mill at present is a Clausing 8520 (1/2 BP size) with 3/4 HP so 1-1/2 HP is a significant step up for me.
Mike
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Yes I got the stand and coolant pump so I have flood coolant. I had to increse the height of the splash guards so every one and every thing in the shop did not get a shower ;-)
I would reccomend that you buy the stand as it would be hard to reproduce for what they are charging.
I'm very happy with my mill. I would make the purchase again in a flash. it was not perfect, but I believe that I got more than my moneys worth.
The only negatives at all are: 1)The mill had a broken door latch on the electrical cabinet. (Broken when I received it , replaced quickly with no hassles under warenty.)
2)The VFD would sometimes trip off if you decresed the RPM too fast with a large tool in the spindle.
A simple adjuatment pot fixed that issue.
The stand itself had several minor issues.... 3)They relocated the Y axis cableing on the mill and The version of the cabinet did not match so I had to cut a small hole.
4)Some of the splash guard bolts were difficult to get in place, one either needs to have a set of metric hex drivers that you can put on a socket extension, or you need to replace the SHCS with philips screws. since my junk box is a bit light on metric hardware I needed to buy some a metric hex drive socket to get the bolts in.
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d
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snipped-for-privacy@Rasdoc.com wrote in

Paul,
Have you considered Z-axis roughing with a drill bit?
It might make best use of your R8 spindle's limited side load capacity and HP.
G'luck, Paul
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