OT: possible replacement for manufacturing jobs

rec.crafts.metalworking:


On a Puppy-Peed Bun?
--

I used to be an anarchist but had to give it up: _far_ too many rules.

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wrote in

I forget the rest of it. I used to see the whole pitch on T-shirts. 'Haven't seen one for a while.
-- Ed Huntress
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Eregon wrote:

I don't really care what they do anymore. I stopped eating there a while back, and the only thing I could eat was a plain cheeseburger. Nothing else would stay down long enough to digest. :(
--
You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense!

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wrote:

You're a smart guy, but you're thinking too inside the box. It's understandable that people do this because the government does the same thing - lumping software in with the services industry.
It's a different animal than the traditional services industry. When someone purchases a piece of software, what they're really doing is purchasing the right to use a piece of intellectual property. Same goes for song downloads off itunes.
The government does that lumping in because they're a bunch of bureaucrats and they didn't think about how to address software and other intellectual property when it first started to become statistically significant. **** Good point. I forgot we are leasing the stuff usually. I still think the creation of software is manufacturing.
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Kurgan. presented by Gringioni. wrote:

Actually, I called IT a service industry because (at its best) it serves the three basic activities, but isn't one of them.
You're right, though, about intellectual property being a special case. If I invent a better way to extract ore from the Earth, or to cut metal more precisely, or to grow food more efficiently, that's not mining, nor manufacturing, nor agriculture; but it's a potential for doing those things which didn't exist before. So there's wealth to be created if my inventions are put to use, and plenty of reason for people to pay real money for them; but they're not quite the same as if actual wealth was already been created.
Intellectual property is like fuel in a car. It makes driving possible; but won't actually get you anywhere till somebody does somethig real with it, like starting the engine and stepping on the accelerator. The fuel has no value of its own unless there's already a car to fuel and someone to drive it.
But, strictly speaking, a way to improve one or more of the basic activities is still just a service. An important service, maybe; but distinct from the basics.
The term Information Technology will always beg the question "Information about what?". If you're talking about a form of IT that has real value for productive purposes, and not just the kind (like music downloads) that are consumable but not productive, then the answer to the question always has to be one of the three basic things that make an economy possible.
KG
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I can't argue with any of that.
The problem I have with the way the government keeps track of it statistically is that tech hardware and software is allowing us to do more and more and more for less money, but it isn't reflected in their statistics. As a result people are lulled into this idea that our lives are getting worse due to the statistical stagnation in wages.
In some areas, that may be true (for instance if one is into consuming cars and real estate), but tech it isn't and given the ever increasing amounts of time people are spending on the Internet . . . .
We're getting more and more for less. It just doesn't look that way statistically and it's because the government bureaucrats either don't understand it or don't make an attempt to quantify it when they track economic activity.
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Kirk Gordon wrote:

But, but, but... Agriculture - we (the "western" world) produce more food than ever before, but nobody works there any more.
Manufacturing - nobody works "here" any more.
Knowledge-based industries - India for starters, is absorbing a huge chunk of what used to be "western" jobs in software; watch for biotech migration away from here, too. The embrionic stem-cell ban sent a lot of money into labs in other countries - it ain't comin' back.
My cynicism may be founded on realism - what's gonna create teh wealth HERE in the next 30 years? /mark
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On Mon, 18 May 2009 13:41:20 -0400, Kirk Gordon
<snip a long but informative post>

========The golden rule in operation, the one that states "when you got the gold, you make the rules..."
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid 601109&sid=aHtly5QjUYzo&refer=home Mafia Cash Increases Grip on Sinking Italy Defying Berlusconi
Does anyone have information [cites please] of mob money at work in the US like this?
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
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wrote:

But our money isn't backed up by gold anymore? The government doesnt have the gold. You'd have to say he who has the printing press makes the rules.
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The gold standard is an anachronism. It was needed back in the day, but not anymore.
Remember what money is. All it does is establish relative value between goods and services so we don't have to barter.
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wrote:

The gold standard is an anachronism. It was needed back in the day, but not anymore.
Remember what money is. All it does is establish relative value between goods and services so we don't have to barter. _________________________________
But it prevents the government from inflating the dollar, by printing "money". Keeps the barter value equal between all entities. Print twice as much money, and you will require twice a many dollars for the same item.
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ge wrote:

You've gotta have a relatively disciplined government.
We haven't had much inflation for 25 years. One reason is that the Fed Chairman isn't an elected position.
That sort of transparency is why the dollar is the world's reserve currency.
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