HELP on Allen Bradley SLC500

Hallo to everyone!
I'm looking for answers to a few questions about Allen Bradley SLC500
controller:
1. Can someone tell me if is there any way to unlock the password
protection on SLC500 family's controllers without source code files?
2. Can I write SLC500 code able to delete itself? I'll try to explain
better: I need to write some "rungs" that must disappear from
controller program after their execution. No matter if after rungs
deletion the program will stop.
Can someone kindly try to answer to my questions?
Tank you, bye
G.V.
Reply to
g.v.
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You really need to better explain what you want to do and why before anyone can help you.
The answer to both your questions is simple: NO.
Jake
Reply to
Jake
Hy Jake,
I need to do that things just for protection of my software. To stop it at a certain date, just to give to my customer an evaluation period for the system...
I've some little "payment-problem" with a few customers...
Tank you Bye
g.v.
Reply to
g.v.
Hy Jake,
I need to do that things just for protection of my software. To stop it at a certain date, just to give to my customer an evaluation period for the system...
I've some little "payment-problem" with a few customers...
Tank you Bye
g.v.
Reply to
g.v.
If an evaluation period is desired, then password protecting the processor would achieve the desired result. The only way past it is to clear the memory. So the program goes away too. People do this all of the time with proprietary systems that offer support and to keep unscrupulous competitors from stealing the designs.
As far as software time bombs, there could be some legal problems, whether they paid you or not. Unless the fact was disclosed in the contract. A simple condition to compare processor date against a preprogrammed death date and force the program into a latched Estop. Just give yourself plenty of time for the follow up visit or it may be your last sale.
After payment another site/modem visit would be required to download a clean program.
I had someone tell me once that a system we bought was his intellectual property and we couldn't have the password or files, until we reminded him that we paid for the developement and programming time.
Reply to
me
Having implemented a system with a pre-programmed shutdown date (it was for a demonstration facility only) I agree that the fact that the system would cease to operate after a given date/time is necessary. I linked mine to the fact that it was a temporary installation and that as such it needed re-inspection and safety certification for continued operation beyond the initial period. After such re-inspection and certification the operating period could be reset for another short duration.
The linking of continued operation to safety inspection is, in my view, quite valid and, of course, you want to be paid for conducting those inspections.
If it is equipment that could remain safe in operation then there are other (legal) means by which any money owed could be extracted from the client.
Reply to
Paul E. Bennett
Steve,
I pretty much agree with all your comments here, but I did want to add a few things.
The OP worried me a little with the framing of the question, as the information could be used for various nefarious purposes. Locking the processor may be a necessary option, but not deleting the code contained within.
I do not believe that programmed shutdowns are a viable protection scheme if the processor is controlling real-word I/O... triggering an orderly, safe shutdown has the potential of costing a client a lot of money, and raises all kinds of legal issues that I would not wish to confront. Triggering a processor fault by deleting a running program could be deadly.
The A/B line password protection scheme will not allow anyone to view or download the code without an identical off-line version of the program residing at the workstation. Therefore, copying is effectively prohibited.
We 'usually' provide the programming for all clients, as it is often very valuable for them to have access in order to troubleshoot issues. Newer versions of RSLinx alone will allow looking into the data registers, and if documentation is provided, many times that's enough to pin-point problems.
As you said, there is too much work around to worry about nutty schemes insuring payment... you just do business with those who will pay for your effort.
Jake
Reply to
Jake
I don't see how that can be if it's written into the contract and known to the customer before any work is undertaken. I did a job on spec using that approach. (Part of the arrangement was that I was free to peddle the work to his competitors if the prospective customer declined to buy.) The customer needs to know the date of the shutdown and understand that you are willing to extend it is you can be persuaded that an extension is warranted.
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry Avins
How would shutting down a process (costing the client money) help you get paid? I would suggest two things:
1. Password the program and let it go at that. Sooner or later they will need or want an enhancement/repair.
2. Simply do not do work for customers that don't pay promptly. There's plenty of work out there if you're any good at all. I only do work for companies that will pay within 60 days. The ones that pay in 30 get better service, and the one that pays in 10 gets the best service.
Despite the fact that the software is yours until paid for, many folks will see a programmed shutdown as extortion and react accordingly.
Reply to
Steve Cothran
Sorry to be so wordy here...but this is a "near and dear" issue for me. Our clients always receive complete docs with lush comments. Why? So when the thing quits at 0300 on a Sunday morning, I can continue sleeping.
Reply to
Steve Cothran
I can only say... Yep... We really do, too. And I always appreciate it when I have to work with somebody else's stuff.
Have you ever tried to get a OEM at 0300 on a Sunday? Forget it... it ain't happening.
We give the client the code, and even put a disk sleeve in the door so a tech can find it!
I guess it's all about who your client base is...
Jake
Reply to
Jake

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