best low-temp solder?

I've had good luck with the kester 62/36/2% silver stuff, which is eutectic.
Many many years ago, I had some luck with a indium-bismuth solder paste
in syringes from Indium Corp. Haven't fiddled with any of their stuff since then.
Radio Shack sells a bag of little peices of tape-form stuff. Never got it to work well.
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plain old 60-40 rosin-core electrical solder has worked well for me - got mine at a hamfest on a half-pound roll. the silver stuff (I believe) melts at higher temperatures - and higher temperatures are not good for electronics. eutectic (if my memory serves) just means it's either solid or liquid - and won't just 'soften' - like ice and water. hth Hal w4pmj
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Silver-bearing solder is for use with silver plated terminal strips (such as Tektronix used to use); silver in the solder prevents the silver on the terminals from being dissolved by the solder and ruined.
Isaac
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Also, there are things like stainless steel, and aluminium that don't like regular 60/40 solder-- however silver solder will solder to stainless antenna rods (repair antenna whips, ect). and aluminium is easy to solder to, but consider : 1) that aluminium oxide WON'T allow solder to adhear to it, and that : 2) aluminium oxidizes almost immedietly ! The way to solder to aluminium without special solders/ fluxes is to scrape the surface, and then immediatly apply hot iron and solder. Then solder will adhear to it! As a side note, concerning the oxidation of aluminium, consider that the silver powder in fireworks is powdered aluminium! Have a friend , whose dad told of his experience with it (powdered)-- was used to make aluminium based paint- he was told by his boss to get rid of it-- threw it into an incinerator-- and, KABKOOIE ! as info, Jim NN7K
Isaac Wingfield wrote:

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As a side note, concerning

IIRC, 'Thermite' is made from Iron Oxide and Aluminium powder, and that burns rather hot!
Dave
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| IIRC, 'Thermite' is made from Iron Oxide and Aluminium powder, and that | burns rather hot!
A similar product was used to paint the Hindenburg and it is now believed by many (but not all) that it was this that destroyed it. The film of the flames looks 'wrong' for a hydrogen fire. A sample of the skin, which had been saved for many years, was subjected to a spark test and burned with great enthusiasm.
See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindenburg_disaster
N
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On Mon, 17 Jan 2005 01:20:08 +0000, NSM wrote:

I guesss. Hydrogen/oxygen burns without a visible flame. The shell of the Hindenburgh was obviously on fire. ...and it was painted with an aluminum paint (Iron??), which was quite normal at the time.
--
Keith

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| I guesss. Hydrogen/oxygen burns without a visible flame. The shell of | the Hindenburgh was obviously on fire. ...and it was painted with an | aluminum paint (Iron??), which was quite normal at the time.
Apparently this was the first time this particular product was used - and the last as the Zeppelin company did further tests on the paint and never used it again.
N
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It's inevitable that every time this topic comes up, someone confuses the 2 or 3% silver-loaded tin-lead solder with the hard solders known as "silver solder". They're entirely different things. The 2 or 3% silver-loaded tin-lead solder is a soft solder, very similar in use and properties to ordinary tin-lead solder. The "silver solders" used for brazing stainless steel and other materials are hard solders, with a much higher melting point and very different properties.
Roy Lewallen, W7EL
Jim - NN7K wrote:

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If you say so. That wasn't the question.

No. http://216.239.57.104/search?q che:WG_VLmYPkY8J:www.kappalloy.com/SolderElectronic.html+62-36-2+179-354+60-40-183-191
No. http://216.239.57.104/search?q che:WG_VLmYPkY8J:www.kappalloy.com/SolderElectronic.html+62-36-2+179-354+60-40-183-191
Yup--and that's important for good results.
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************** Oh contraire Pierre - the question was ...."Favorites ?" (look at the Original post) That was mine - because it works for me.. sheesh ! *******************

***** I thought so ******
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Next time, just before you hit the Post button, you might want to look at the title of the thread. If he just meant *solder*, he wouldn't have included *low-temp* in the Subject line.
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On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 20:23:24 -0500, "Hal Rosser"

The silver stuff
Regards

Daveb
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| > | > Next time, just before you hit the Post button, | > you might want to look at the title of the thread. | > If he just meant *solder*, | > he wouldn't have included *low-temp* in the Subject line. | > | so - | what's your "favorite" solder, dude?
Best of British: "Multicore Solders Ltd, Kelsey House, Wood Lane End, Hemel Hempstead"
N
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Back when I was doing microwave stripline-on-sapphire, the solder of choice was a mixture of tin and indium (and perhaps a bit of bismuth) that we called tindium. It melted well below the boiling point of water. (No, it wasn't Wood's metal.)
Jim
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I haven't seen it yet, but I've heard stories about guys who make spoons of such stuff. When the victim withdraws the stump from his coffee, you're supposed to say, "Man. That's some STRONG coffee".
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... and there's no truth in the rumour that Uri Geller buys them in bulk :)
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Mike Brown: mjb[at]pootle.demon.co.uk | http://www.pootle.demon.co.uk /
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On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 23:43:35 -0500 "Hal Rosser"

The eutectic alloy is the one which has the right proportions to give it the minimum melting point for a given set of constituent metals. I've only seen the word applied to binary alloys, but I suppose it could be applied to alloys of 3 or more metals, too. I'm not sure if that's a proper use of the term, however.
A side effect of using the eutectic alloy is that there is a distinctive melting point. When the alloy is non-eutectic, there are separate solidus and liquidus points, between which the alloy is just more or less "slushy."
There is no slushy region when a eutectic alloy melts. This sounds like what Hal was describing above.
- ----------------------------------------------- Jim Adney snipped-for-privacy@vwtype3.org Madison, WI 53711 USA -----------------------------------------------
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The eutectic combination of tin and lead is 63% tin, 37% lead. 60/40 has a slightly higher melting point, and unlike the eutectic alloy, has a plastic stage between liquid and solid. Consequently, 63/37 is a better choice for solder.
Roy Lewallen, W7EL
Hal Rosser wrote:

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lead is lethal, even non leaded solder fumes should be avoided too right, little boys like the smell though }:-o
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