centrifugal switch in a 3 phase motor?

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It is certainly possible to use switches to switch in power factor correction capacitors--but on a fractional horsepower motor? In fact it seems strange to have such a three phase motor anyway.
Again, for large motors, it might make sense for wound rotors to have series resistance in order to increase starting torque without crazily low power factor (high current).
Bill
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James Sweet wrote:

I agree it looks like centrifugal weights on the shaft device.
Could be to indicate something more critical, like failure of forced air to a burner.
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There are two explanations that I can see- James has indicated one - an auxiliary shut of switch. Another could be that this motor was designed as a one size fits all- if 3 phase supply available- run as a 3 phase machine- otherwise an easy modification(with help of a capacitor) to single phase operation. Mass manufacturing cost savings being the motive.
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James Sweet wrote:

Some old minicomputer hard drives had a speed interlock to prevent the controller from moving the heads until the disc was close to full speed.
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