demand of Reactive power at motor stalling

I have a question about the demand of Reactive power at motor stalling. It is always mention that "reactive power demands of load
increase with motor stalling". However, should it be the other way around? When it is stalling, the voltage drops and it actually takes less current through the inductance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Typically, line voltage does *not* drop very much when the motor is stalled. The frequency induced into the rotor is proportional to slip, so at stall (100% slip), the frequency in the rotor is equal to line. The inductive reactance of the rotor is higher then the resistance at stall, so the line current power factor is very low (0.1 is not unheard of).
So, stalled motor, high current, low power factor => Hi reactive demand.
daestrom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/15/07 11:59 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@e51g2000hsg.googlegroups.com, "kelfookf"

I have some trouble understanding the details of the question.
Nevertheless, an induction motor is pretty much like a transformer. At stall, slip is one and the motor truly is a transformer. The primary is the main motor winding that provides the rotating field. The secondary is the rotor that can be either a wound rotor or the more likely squirrel cage. This secondary is a short. Current is limited by the leakage reactance and secondary resistance which is usually kept low. Thus, except for the residual resistance, primary current is set by this reactance. The current will be mostly reactive.
Bill -- Fermez le Bush--about two years to go.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| I have a question about the demand of Reactive power at motor | stalling. It is always mention that "reactive power demands of load | increase with motor stalling". However, should it be the other way | around? When it is stalling, the voltage drops and it actually takes | less current through the inductance.
The voltage across the load will still be mostly there. The current will be high. Less work is being done (the "work" that is being done is heating the windings and other wires). With less work there is less power used. Less power used relative to volt*amps means low power factor which means more reactive.
--
|---------------------------------------/----------------------------------|
| Phil Howard KA9WGN (ka9wgn.ham.org) / Do not send to the address below |
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The inrush current in a motor is often about six times the normal full load current. This current is often called the 'blocked rotor' current because it is the current that flows when the rotor is at zero speed -- as occurs at startup, or a with a blocked rotor, or when otherwise stalled.
The resistance of the rotor reflected to the stator circuit is "R2'/s" where s is slip ... so with the motor running at rated speed with slip of say s=0.04, the rotor resistance as seen by the stator is much higher than when the motor is stalled, with slip s=1. I believe this is what gives rise to the higher current at lower speed.
j
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.