280V motor on 230V circuit

I have a broken pool motor [magnetek y56y] which will cost a bundle to fix or repair. While doing a search on the web, I found the same model (really cheap)
but wired for 280V, instead of the 230 V load that my wiring is supplies. Now, I was thinking of buying the cheap 280V model and installing it instead. Aside from rotating at a different speed and maybe some power inefficiencies, are there any other drawbacks of using the 280V model instead?
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If it's the same model motor, you might be able to rewire it for your 230V supply. Look at the nameplate or inside the wiring chamber to see if there is a wiring diagram that details wiring connections for different voltages. Barring that, you might search the Mfr's website (if they are still in business) or Google for the make and model of your motor and see if there is any data on it that details the wiring instructions.
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What's broken on the original motor? There isn't a whole lot to go wrong with these, I've yet to run into one I couldn't fix.
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230V
there
characters
Me too. Usually it's just been corrosion that can be cleaned off and/or lack or lubrication.
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I tried first by replacing the capacitor. I could not pry off the pump because it was rusted shut and bolted on well. The repair guy said it was a break in the winding. He is rewinding it for $170. I was thinking of doing it myself but I was told that rewinding it manually is tough.
BTW, I cannot refind the "for sale" motor on the web anymore.

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This is standard with "pool stuff" around water.

He is right, it is.

Here's the first lesson in "shopping like a woman": Ya snooze, Ya loose! You see that "good price" you MUST buy it right then and there. If you futz around trying to make up your mind, it'll always be too late! Later it will be gone. [Hey, you think there's nobody else out there who can spot a bargain like you?]
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BUY IT! You'll thank yourself 10 years from now! The speed diffrence wil be neglegable, the duty-cycle will be such that the motor will enjoy a much longer life... if anything you could step-up RPM by adding pulleys and a drive-belt rather than direct-drive coupled as it is now... The pulley/belts would also minimize start-shock to the pump by softening the inital roll in of the motor...
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Deodiaus wrote:

are you sure it isn't 208 ?
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On Apr 26, 6:14pm, Jamie

I'd be suspicious that the 280V was a misreading somehow of 230V.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

that sounds more plausible.
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Or... of 208V. If you have a "three phase" circuit coming into a building, and you run two "hot" wires to your appliance (or motor), the effective voltage you're getting is 208V.
There's enough overlap so that a standard 240V appliance such as, say, a larger air conditioner, will work more or less ok on 208V. And vice versa.
But there is most assuredely a difference in the two circuits, so for optimal results, you'll want an appliance (or motor) designed for the specific wiring in your facility.
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Jamie wrote:

I'm a little confused about a 230 volt circuit. In what part of the world does the utility supply 230v?
jak
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----------------------------
wrote:

----- Depending on the age of the motor it could be rated 230V which now has crept up to 240V just as once we had 110V, then 115V then 120V as nominal voltages -(except for the radio people who settled on 117V and assumed that that was what you got.).
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Don Kelly wrote:

Here in New Zealand, the mains voltage is 230 volts, likewise Australia.
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wrote:

Most except the USA and Canada and a few others.
John G.
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| I'm a little confused about a 230 volt circuit. In what part of the | world does the utility supply 230v?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_power_systems
There are two different flavors of 220/230/240 volts. Some places have a simple system with one wire hot and one wire grounded. Other places have a split system where the voltage is split in half to get 110/115/120 volts relative to ground, by adding a additional "middle" conductor that is the grounded one.
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wrote:

Sonny, you need to LEARN the difference between Ground and Neutral...... before you spout any further BS.......
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What he wrote looks reasonable to me in terms of ground and neutral. Neutral is the grounded conductor where I live. He does not say to use a ground as a neutral, if that's what you're getting at. I can only guess that that may be what you're getting at, you haven't really said.
[trimmed sci.physics.electromag]
j
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|
| |> wrote: |> |>> There are two different flavors of 220/230/240 volts. Some places |>> have a |>> simple system with one wire hot and one wire grounded. Other |>> places have |>> a split system where the voltage is split in half to get |>> 110/115/120 volts |>> relative to ground, by adding a additional "middle" conductor that |>> is the |>> grounded one. |> |> Sonny, you need to LEARN the difference between Ground and |> Neutral...... |> before you spout any further BS....... | | What he wrote looks reasonable to me in terms of ground and neutral. | Neutral is the grounded conductor where I live. He does not say to | use a ground as a neutral, if that's what you're getting at. I can | only guess that that may be what you're getting at, you haven't really | said.
He might be one of those "knows just enough to be really dangerous" people on the net. I didn't even mention "neutral". My intent was to explain it in a simpler way for someone to just understand the basic difference. The term "middle" was to convey a little more information than "neutral" would have ... for the targeted audience.
There were two reasons Edison used a split system. One was to get the advantage of less voltage drop and/or longer wires. The other was to run the light bulbs on a lower voltage, which he knew makes them more reliable.
If he had not been fixated on DC, and had simply accepted AC early on, he might well have discovered that an even lower voltage made the bulbs even more reliable, and that a step down transformer at each building would have done the job reliably, and also allow him to distribute at a higher voltage. For example, he could have distributed at 600 volts and stepped down to 30 volts inside each building (maybe on a floor by floor basis). OTOH, he could have run a DC motor-generator to get a lower voltage, too (though it would have been less reliable than a transformer on AC). Had the light bulb voltage issue not been a factor, he might well have simply run a straight 2-wire 220 volt system.
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<SNIP>
Well, I understood what he meant, but maybe I took it the wrong way. When he said middle conudctor I was thinking the center lug on the transformer which is grounded and used as the neutral.
Mike
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