How to get a concrete but out


I borrowed a milwaki 1.5 inch hammer drill from work. I got a 1 inch
drill bit stuck in the foundation cement of my house. I was trying to
bust out this area so a piece of conduit would be flush with the wall
to go up the outside of the wall into my attic.
I have tried everything. One thing I could not figure out. How do you
get the drill to go in reverse? DO these type of drills even have a
reverse? I appreciate your help!
Reply to
stryped
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stryped fired this volley in news:93ace626-9669- snipped-for-privacy@j24g2000yqa.googlegroups.com:
Did you ever consider just turning the whole rig counter-clockwise by hand?
No, probably not. Just get a torch and cut the bit off flush with the concrete.
No! Never mind. That won't work; you'll burn down your house.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Never known this to happen, anywhere - how did you manage to do it? And have you ever used a hammer drill before? They dont have a reverse - no one has ever got a bit stuck, so it hasn't been needed......... Andrew VK3BFA.
Reply to
Andrew VK3BFA
chuckle.....lol
Both of my Hiltis have reverse..both are hammer drills...both have had reversed MANY times to get that bit unstuck
Gunner
"IMHO, some people here give Jeff far more attention than he deserves, but obviously craves. The most appropriate response, and perhaps the cruelest, IMO, is to simply killfile and ignore him. An alternative, if you must, would be to post the same standard reply to his every post, listing the manifold reasons why he ought to be ignored. Just my $0.02 worth."
Reply to
Gunner Asch
I swaer I cant find it. There is a switch for hammer, un hammer but that is it.
Reply to
stryped
It is a Milwalki cat no 5347 and a serial number 688A 19515 0060. I looked for a product manual online that might tell me how to get it in reverse but have had no luck as of yet. I really appreciate your help!
Reply to
stryped
Then grab on the end of it with a small pipe wrench and turn it backwards and pull at the same time. Once it starts moving...attach it to the drill again and fire the bitch up and pull it out.
You will probably need to file gently..the jaw marks on the drill shank..but it works
Gunner
"IMHO, some people here give Jeff far more attention than he deserves, but obviously craves. The most appropriate response, and perhaps the cruelest, IMO, is to simply killfile and ignore him. An alternative, if you must, would be to post the same standard reply to his every post, listing the manifold reasons why he ought to be ignored. Just my $0.02 worth."
Reply to
Gunner Asch
"Like the other Magnums, the Forward/Reverse lever above the trigger is too small, but not nearly as difficult as the trigger lock button"
Might want to check above the trigger.....shrug
Gunner
"IMHO, some people here give Jeff far more attention than he deserves, but obviously craves. The most appropriate response, and perhaps the cruelest, IMO, is to simply killfile and ignore him. An alternative, if you must, would be to post the same standard reply to his every post, listing the manifold reasons why he ought to be ignored. Just my $0.02 worth."
Reply to
Gunner Asch
I will check again but my drill does not look like that one. The one I have does not resemble a standard drill.
Reply to
stryped
This is the drill I have:
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There is no button above the trigger or anywhere else that I can find.
Reply to
stryped
ide quoted text -
Here is the product manual for the drill I have. I see no mention of a reverse:
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Reply to
stryped
have:
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quoted text -
The references you provide aren't for a "hammer-drill" it is for a "rotary-hammer" a different sort of best. You should be using a chisel sort of bit, not a drill. Think "small electric jackhammer" and you will be closer to the actual tool.
Cheers,
John B. (johnbslocomatgmaildotcom)
Reply to
John
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I have a slightly older version of this drill. No reverse.
So as I said...use a pipe wrench, or a 7/16 socket and back the drill bit itself in reverse a bit and slowly pull it out. If you can get it to turn...hook the drill back up to it, and while PULLING on it..hit the go switch and work it out.
Gunner
"IMHO, some people here give Jeff far more attention than he deserves, but obviously craves. The most appropriate response, and perhaps the cruelest, IMO, is to simply killfile and ignore him. An alternative, if you must, would be to post the same standard reply to his every post, listing the manifold reasons why he ought to be ignored. Just my $0.02 worth."
Reply to
Gunner Asch
have:
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quoted text -
Actually..it IS a hammer drill. An "early" version. I have several B&D "electric jack hammers" and they work far differently than the Milwaukee does. And they do use "star" drills
Gunner
"IMHO, some people here give Jeff far more attention than he deserves, but obviously craves. The most appropriate response, and perhaps the cruelest, IMO, is to simply killfile and ignore him. An alternative, if you must, would be to post the same standard reply to his every post, listing the manifold reasons why he ought to be ignored. Just my $0.02 worth."
Reply to
Gunner Asch
So a 7/16 socket will fit the toothed end of the bit? I dont have a pipe wrench.
One thing I noticed is the clutch is slipping alot which may be part of the problem. Is the clutch adjustable?
By the way, this is a rotary hammer.
Reply to
stryped
have:
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the end that goes into the drill, is a 7/16 hex, right? As for pipe wrench..borrow one, or buy a 10"-14" one at Harbor Freight, or even the biggest pair of Channel Locks you can find.
Everyone needs a pipe wrench, particularly if you are doing a lot of Stuff around a shop. I suggest buying a cheap 14". Might cost you $7 when they arent on sale.
The clutch is Replaceable, not adjustable as I recall.
Gunner
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Reply to
Gunner Asch
Leave it plugged in. Use a pipe wrench to turn the bit counterclockwise even a little bit. Remove the pipe wrench. (thought I better make that clear) Hit the switch while holding back on the drill. If the bit will turn, keep it turning and wiggle the drill mostly backwards to get it out of the hole. There is usually a magic place where it is willing to turn, just not go forward or back. Find that place, keep the bit turning, ease it forward and back to gain enough clearance for the bit.
You will develop a feel and sense of sound for when the bit is trying to bind. Back off instantly and keep the bit turning. You can peck gently at the bind point until you get past the problem even if it is rebar in the center of hole.
Reply to
DanG
e:
lternative, if
It is a splined end of bit. Not a hex head.
I used a pair of vice grips ont eh smooth part of the bit. It would just split.
Reply to
stryped
ote:
alternative, if
=A0Just my $0.02
This is what the bit looks like:
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Reply to
stryped
stryped wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@d21g2000yqn.googlegroups.com:
Have you tried just hammering on the back end a bit? I'd protect the metal spline with something & then "use a bigger hammer" just enough to free it up. You should be able to deliver a better whack than the rotary hammer can, and that might be enough to free it. I'd sneak up on it, applying just enough force to exceed what the rotary hammer can deliver.
Doug White
Reply to
Doug White

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