motor on bicycle

because of the high proce of gas, would putting a motor on a bicycle be practicle to get to work a few days a week? I live about 18 miles away it is all highway with a wide berm for bicycles. I have a spare 5 horse motor from an old tiller. Could I mount a bracket and put it above my back wheel to drive the back wheel on my 10 speed mountain bike? Would I be able to pedal it home if the engine failed? How would I rig a clutch of some sort or would I even need it? Seems like an interesting project.

How fast could you go with a 5 horse motor?

Reply to
stryped
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to their site, these will go about 25-30mph. You could use the pictures as references for your own design.

good luck, walt

Reply to
wallster

Hey! I can tell you a better way to do this. It'd be a lot better just to go ahead and buy a motorcycle. They come in lots of HP's and speeds, and besides, they are instantly available whereas your experiments would take lots of time and $.

Reply to
Robert Swinney

He's back! How I missed you!

How often a week do you go to work? If you really want to save gas, I would go with DHMO. Nasty stuff, but damned cheap! No more gas bills!

Read this:

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HTH, Nick

Reply to
Nick Müller

Some places the speed of unlicensed vehicles and motorized bicycles is limited, check your local laws.

Reply to
Ed Earl Ross

The old Solex design attached the motor above the front wheel on a pivot. The motor and drive roller lifted off the wheel to declutch.

Check your local Moped laws.

Reply to
jim.wilkins

Yes.

Jim

Reply to
jim rozen

I wouldn't wish DHMO on my worst enemy! We've had _severe_ DHMO fallout around our area for the last three weeks.

Trees are actually dying! People are getting sick. I've even seen _earthworms_ coming up out of the ground and dying because of it. And in New Orleans, the DHMO pollution has gotten so bad that humans are dying from it.

It's terrible. No... NO! Even Stryped shouldn't be maliciously directed toward mis-use of DHMO.

C'mon, Nick! Even for your enemies, you oughta have SOME heart!

LLoyd

Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh

What you are looking for was marketed and known as a "Whizzer" bike back in the 40's and early 50's. The motor mounted in the frame just above and slightly ahead of the pedal crank. Do a google and see what you can find. By the way, I had two and they used a simple centrifugal clutch with v-belt drive to the rear wheel. Should be easy to clone one.

George Vigneron

Reply to
George

OK, I nearly got killed when some idiots spreaded a bit of crystal (!) DHMO on the highway!

Nick

Reply to
Nick Müller

Was it the white crystal form, or the black form? The black stuff is much more hazardous, just so you know.

Reply to
Dave Hinz

in the 40's and early 50's. The motor mounted in the frame just above and slightly ahead of the pedal crank. Do a google and see what you can find. By the way, I had two and they used a simple centrifugal clutch with v-belt drive to the rear wheel. Should be easy to clone one."

Reply to
Bret Ludwig

The setup I saw once was a bicycle that was built for a disc brake in the rear. Or, rather, the hub was built so. Then he made an adapter plate to put a large chain wheel (like you see at the crank of the bike, but bigger) on the disc brake mount, and mounted a chain saw on a luggage rack above the rear wheel. The chain saw power head came with a clutch, so revving up would propel the bike, and idling or cutting it off would disengage automatically. The normal drive line was right where it always was, so if the engine failed he could pedal normally. I think he could go about 30mph tops, and the range on one tank (under a quart) was enough to go however far he went in a day. The engine spins up to 14,000 RPM, so it was a big reduction from the engine to the chain ring. The downside is that it's loud and even with his reduction the engine had to stay below 14,000 RPM most of the time, which caused carbon buildup. After one engine crapped out he got into the habit of jacking up the rear wheel (put down kick-stand on concrete and leaned the bike) and ran the engine at full throttle for a little bit to help clean it up. Dunno if that even helped, though--I moved. Personally, I'm working on my legs so I can pedal like hell without wussing out like I do now. (:

Reply to
B.B.

interesting

Plenty fast-I did this about 30 years ago...

Reply to
Rick

Give a look at electric power too. Might be cleaner and cheaper to run depending on what you have to pay per kwh, and maybe you could recharge at work for free off one of your your boss's outlets. :-)

Some designs use regenerative braking too. Just Google "electric bicycle" for nearly 3 million hits.

I'm no expert, but you might be able to skirt the motor vehicle licensing/insurance regs where you live more easily with electric power than with gas; at least there'd be less noise to cause cop's heads to turn.

Jeff

Reply to
Jeff Wisnia

Back to the future... See

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Your major problem (once you get it running and past the DMV) will be being catapulted into the cemetery by a sweet young thing driving a gigunda SUV and talking on her cell phone. Famous last words you will hear are "but officer, I didn't even see him ..."

Buy a ready to go scooter or motorcycle [I suggest a minimum of

250 cc for US conditions] and take the MSF new riders course [see
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] even if its not required in your state
  • BEFORE* you hit the road. Always wear a safety helmet.

As for your questions about how fast you can go with a 5 hp motor

-- fast enough to get killed.

Reply to
F. George McDuffee

Yes, the black monocrystal form! :-(( Next day a brief report about that spill of DHMO was in the newspaper. The reponsibles aren't caught yet.

Nick

Reply to
Nick Müller

Ah yes, we had a problem with that at a fire scene a few years ago. It made the fire department's response very much more hazardous, and quite frankly slowed down the firefighting efforts and effectiveness significantly. Nearly caused significant damage to two of our vehicles, as well.

Reply to
Dave Hinz

No wounder! They use DHMO in nuclear power plants. One can imagine what

  • that** means. In the beginning of the exploitation of DHMO they used it in nearly 100% pure form! And later, they even heated it up to well obove 200°F! Lots of explosions und people got hurt or killed.

But don't think that they quit using DHMO. Research is going on to use a complex gas mixture that, when ignited, produces _pure_ evaporated DHMO.

Nick

Reply to
Nick Müller

Use an electric motor, you won't have the fumes and won't have to stop for fuel. Just unroll the extension cord as you go to work and roll it back up again as you come home.

A variable frequency drive would allow you to use a 3phase motor and have speed selection, this would be an asset in traffic.

John

Reply to
JohnM

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