motor starndards outside NA

Motors all seem to follow NEMA sizes and standards in North America. What are the standards outside the US? Do chinese and
italian machinery use standardized motor mounts and sizes? It seems foreign industrial motors are usually rated in kW and not
horsepower, but I've also never seen clearly marked motor frame sizes on danish machinery like on all motors here. I want to know
how that all works.
When I asked about electrial conduit benders, there was never a clear answer about hand bender differences, other than they don't
seem to use same tools outside the US. I still want to know how a portuguese eletrician does a back to back bend with metallic
tube.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
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AFAIK modern motors conform to the IEC metric motor standards and while rated in kW are frequently in sizes recognisable as hp ie 0.75kW = 1hp, 2.2kW = 3hp etc. That said I have run across some modern motors with non standard features such as smaller than standard key which I could deal with when the motor was replaced by broaching the fan to the standard key size.
Reply to
David Billington
Dunno about electric motors or large engines. But I was totally but happily shocked to find that a very recent, Chinese small gas engine from a power washer was a simple bolt-on relacement for the Clinton engine on my early 70s TroyBilt garden tiller. Bolt pattern, size & threads, shaft diameter and keyway all the same. I'd been procrastinating, struggling with the deteriorating Clinton because I didn't want to deal with solving all the potential adapter problems. Turns out they wasn't none of them at all. Who knew?
I'm an old guy, the kind of old guy that young guys go to because they know everything. And dang! I don't know everything yet.
Reply to
Mike Spencer
Dunno about electric motors or large engines. But I was totally but happily shocked to find that a very recent, Chinese small gas engine from a power washer was a simple bolt-on relacement for the Clinton engine on my early 70s TroyBilt garden tiller. Bolt pattern, size & threads, shaft diameter and keyway all the same. I'd been procrastinating, struggling with the deteriorating Clinton because I didn't want to deal with solving all the potential adapter problems. Turns out they wasn't none of them at all. Who knew?
I'm an old guy, the kind of old guy that young guys go to because they know everything. And dang! I don't know everything yet.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Is it like this:
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Do people walk into a supply house and say something like "I need a 1kW D80 in 2800 RPM" or something like that and the rest is magic?
In the US, a super common motor type is "frame 56", you'd still have to specify voltage, number of phases, how it starts, how sealed up it is, and if mounts on a foot or flange at the shaft. It takes some effort to find a replacement, but they're mechanically interchangeable enough where brand doesn't really matter. There's tons if chinese imports made to the same specs too.
Tons of applications use goofy length shafts or just to try to lock you in to paying too much for OEM parts, but there's nearly always an equivalent somebody else sells.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
No just the same as in the US, you need to know 1ph or 3ph, number of poles, if 1ph what starting/running system is used, mounting type etc. If your lucky and it's a motor to the IEC standards you should be able to get another make of motor that fits in place with the same mountings. Some foot mounted motors have removable feet which can be moved around to orient the connection box as required on top or either side, I don't know if the connection box orientation is part of the standard. It's like in the US you're just picking from a different standard, motors are also made to the older standard but not as common.
The woodworking dust extraction fan that failed had the odd key size and the flange details were to standard except it lacked the location ring, shaft size and length were standard, the guy was going to grind the location ring off the replacement motor but I said it would invalidate the warranty so he had his assistant cut a hole in the mounting plate to accept the location ring and all is still good.
Yes, I just had a 1ph 4hp (3kW) motor picked up this afternoon that was a 90L frame and all the replacements I could find were 100L and I don't know if they would fit the table saw, the motor was a special for the table saw maker so they had a monopoly, fortunately I got it working. It was a braked motor and the brake rectifier had failed leading the brake dragging which likely stressed the start cap as that had failed and it seems led to the triac failing that powered the start winding, when those were replaced all worked again and it'll soon be fitted back on the saw to try it in anger.
I know about odd shaft, the dust extractor guy had an old wood planer and that had a special armature shaft and so had to be rewound at some cost, 2 speed motor as well so not quite a standard rewind.
My surface grinder motor is largely standard except the armature shaft and the output end bell is also the belt guard surround and motor mount so when I replaced the bearings, the seemed fine but at 50 years old  treated it to new, I was especially careful to not damage it as a CI casting it could be fragile and likely almost unobtainable 2nd hand.
Reply to
David Billington

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