fused isolator ?

Hi need some help, I have bought a welder unit which came with no plug, on reading the instructions it say = Connect mains lead from unit through
a fused isolator switch, to a 230volt electrical supply with a 20amp fuse rating,,,
is there a transformer or adapter that I can use ??? house is uk regs,, thanks,,,
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JB wrote:

The thing is supposed to be hard wired into a (dedicated) circuit, just as a cooker, electric shower, immersion heater, ait conditioner, etc would be.
Your standard household socket is only rated for 13A and you need 20A - there isn't any transformer or adapter or anything that you can use in association with that socket.
--
Sue





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For what? I believe they mean a fused disconnect switch...
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UK residential is 230 volts, correct?
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Do people not read before they post ??
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Sure do. He wrote the instructions say to connect to a 230 volt supply, not that he has one. He could have got the welder anywhere...
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All houses in the UK have 230 volts. The issue is the current.
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wrote in message

OK..unless you're not allowed to do your own electrical work there (or you don't know how), I couldn't see any mystery in adding a dedicated circuit as described instead of asking about adapters and transformers...
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Rick wrote:

That is possibly because you have a reasonable idea of what a transformer, an adapter and fuse isolators are.
I think that the OP was after a solution that would plug into a standard UK 13A socket.
At least he asked - many would simply have squeezed a 13A plug onto the wires and put in a new fuse each time a combination of rod thickness and amp settting blew the plug fuse.
--
Sue

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Good point. I should have thought of that. Since Jan 1st 2005, there have been tough new changes to building regulations, which if not complied with, could result in a 5,000 fine and an unsaleable property.
The new building regulation Part P, effective since 1st January 2005, requires most electrical work in the home to be carried out by a government-approved electrician, such as one registered with the NICEIC. Its aim is to stop the rising number of deaths from faulty electrics, much of which is undertaken by over ambitious DIY enthusiasts and cowboy electricians.
Under the new law, homeowners are still able to replace accessories such as light switches and sockets to an existing circuit, although there are exceptions for locations such as kitchens and bathrooms. An electrician registered under a government-approved scheme must undertake all other work. The alternative, for DIY'ers, is to notify a local building control body before starting any work and pay the appropriate fee for an inspection and a certificate after work is completed.
Breach of this law is a criminal offence.
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contrex wrote:

A minor correction, but it is the company and not the electrician that is approved and registered.
This is simply a Treasury-motivated move to limit the black economy - fully qualified electricians doing work on the side for cash - under the good old banner of "Health and Safety". There was no "rising numbers of deaths from faulty electrics" done by such people - quite the opposite.
The law restricts the work of domestic electrical installation to companies that are registered and hence registered for tax. Under this law, even those fully qualified chartered electrical engineers that wrote the Wiring Regulations are not able certify the installation of a new exterior light.
If this *had* been concerned with safety, rather than revenue, then individual engineers and not companies would have been examined and certified for competance. As it is, the company can get a 17 year old trainee, who hardly knows one end of a screwdriver from the other, to do the work.
Comapre this with the MOT testing scheme - where it is the individual motor mechanics that are certified and not the company.
--
Sue

















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Actually, the number of deaths was falling year on year, for the last 30 years. However, in a recent Parilmentary answer, the government has had to admit the number of deaths doubled as soon as the new legislation was brought in. This was exactly as predicted by many of those (including me) who commented on the original proposals, because they were based on faulty stats. There were almost no deaths due to DIY. The vast majority were due to old installations which needed work doing on them, followed by a small number of mistakes made by professional electricians. Given this, preventing or making DIY electrical work harder could only increase the deaths, which is exactly what it did.

The local building control is actually responsible for paying for the inspection and a certificate. The BCO's are expected to undertake this themselves. If they want to subcontract it to an electrician, they can but they must pay -- they are not permitted to charge the homeowner -- the standard Building Control fee already covers all inspections. Neither are they permitted to ask the home owner to get it inspected. However, they are permitted to accept an inspection done by the home owner themselves, if they think the home owner is competent to do so. Building Control are not required to use government-approved electricians to perform the inspection, partly because they were originally expected to do it themselves.
--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
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size=2>...</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>&gt; Hi need some help,&nbsp; I have bought a welder unit which came with no plug,<BR>&gt; on reading&nbsp; the instructions it say = Connect mains lead from unit through<BR>&gt; a fused isolator switch, to a 230volt electrical supply with a 20amp fuse <BR>&gt; rating,,,<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; is there a transformer or adapter&nbsp; that I can use ???<BR>&gt; house is uk regs,,&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; thanks,,, <BR>&gt; <BR></FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>try one of these</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><A href="http://www.memonline.com/spsn.html "><FONT face=Arial size=2>http://www.memonline.com/spsn.html </FONT></A></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>or one of these </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><A href="http://www.memonline.com/exel.html#3 "><FONT face=Arial size=2>http://www.memonline.com/exel.html#3 </FONT></A><FONT face=Arial size=2>&nbsp; (part ref 15KXSC2F) </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>the unit will not be mobile once connected, if your upstream protective device is a MCB you will need a D type to cope with the inrush current. </FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV></BODY></HTML>
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