UK question: ES light bulb better than bayonet?

Here in the UK many of the desk lamps I can buy nowadays take a bulb with an Ediscon Screw fitting. Also many wall lights for outdoor use
(sometimes with a PIR detector) take an ES fitting bulb.
Until recently all I ever needed for a general purpose light bulb was a bayonet fitting. Now ES fittings seem to be appearing! Pictures: http://www.bltdirect.co.uk/base.htm
Is there a particular advantage of the ES fitting over the bayonet fitting in these sorts of applications?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No. There are several significant disadvantages to ES bulbs over BC (polarity reversal safety and the bulbs stick, meaning you sometimes need to replace the entire fitting, not just the bulb).
They are becoming more common simply because some markets do not have good availability of BC bulbs and they only want to produce one version of their product.
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In uk.d-i-y, Christian McArdle wrote:

Wossat?
--
Mike Barnes

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 25 Nov 2005 11:38:47 +0000 someone who may be Mike Barnes

If someone wires the live to the screw part of the fitting then it is quite easy for people to touch that part, especially if replacing a bulb.
Of course in many places whether the live is wired to the inner or outer part of the fitting depends on which way round the plug is inserted.
While this doesn't kill millions every day, it is undesirable.
--
David Hansen, Edinburgh
I will *always* explain revoked encryption keys, unless RIP prevents me
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
according to BS7671 you cannot wire a es fitting backwards as the live does not have to be wired to the center pin
Gavin
wrote this:-

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Your copy of BS7671 would appear to be missing regulation 553-03-04. However, lampholders conforming to EN 60238 (both contacts only make connection just as lamp is fully screwed home, and the screw thread of the lampholder is not connected to either contact) are exempt.
It is also a PAT test failure to find an ES lampholder where the ES lampholder is connected the wrong way round.
--
Andrew Gabriel

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Correct, my mistake thats what you get for using memory and not the regs
Gavin
writes:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

I actually find that they're *easier* to remove than bayonet bulbs. On bayonet bulbs, the contact patches are quite soft and the pins from the fitting tend to sink in - making it very difficult to rotate the bulb by the amount needed to release it from the bayonet.
--
Cheers,
Set Square
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Choose a different fitting. I use BC fittings that have a springy metal strip (the also disconnects itself when not 'sprung').
--
The information contained in this post is copyright the
poster, and specifically may not be published in, or used by
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the
Funny that. In all my life I've never had any problem removing a bulb from a BC fitting. However, with ES fittings, several bulbs have had to be removed using pliers, including at least 2 which left the fitting unfit for future service and one that has given me an electric shock. This is despite the fact that over 90% of the total fittings I have used have been BC.
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yup - I've had several where the glass has detached from the base.
--
*Any connection between your reality and mine is purely coincidental

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 25 Nov 2005 14:54:33 -0000, "Christian McArdle"

Screw the bulb in then back it off 1/4 to 1/2 a turn.
sponix
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Christian McArdle explained :

Usually due to someone over tightening - Screw the lamp in just enough to provide adequate contact.
--

Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have had many occasions where BC bulbs stick in holders usually the srings on teh BC contacts have siezed up ... never had an ES bulb size in place, maybe it's just luck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

Surely not! Not in uk-diy! <g>
--
Cheers,
Set Square
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 25 Nov 2005 12:18:04 UTC, "David Lee"

And you can get 'safety' BC fittings where the contacts aren't live unless a bulb is actually fitted - I haven't seen those for ES.
--
The information contained in this post is copyright the
poster, and specifically may not be published in, or used by
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here in the U.S. 'screw base' bulbs are the norm, and I've never seen bayonet base bulbs made for home lighting. It would be very awkward to touch the base when installing them. The only common application we have for bayonet type bulbs is in the automotive field.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 25 Nov 2005, PanHandler wrote:

Not really! Many lamp sockets, even when in proper repair, are constructed and installed such that it's very easy to touch the socket shell when installing or removing a bulb. Let the socket degrade or break partially, and it gets even easier. Let there be a problem with the lamps (remember the Action Tungsram A-line lamps that were widely sold in the '80s and *SUDDENLY* disappeared from store shelves?) and it gets even easier.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Something's pretty fishy about this post. I spent a lot of time in Wales and London both, and never came across a bayonet bulb on anything run from the Mains. I did see bayonets on some lab equipment in Wales, but those weren't run from the mains. I think we're being led down the proverbial path here, or:
Perhaps the OP would/could explain further?
My take is, if a desk lamp takes a bayonet, it's not run from the mains; there is a transformer or ballast of some sort in that appliance. And desk lamps fit that category. Maybe the OP is talking about non-mains non-direct connectons. A lot of outdoor lights, etc. are run on LV via transofrmers et al.
HTH, Pop
: > Here in the UK many of the desk lamps I can buy nowadays take a bulb : > with an Ediscon Screw fitting. Also many wall lights for outdoor use : > (sometimes with a PIR detector) take an ES fitting bulb. : > : > Until recently all I ever needed for a general purpose light bulb was : > a bayonet fitting. Now ES fittings seem to be appearing! : > Pictures: http://www.bltdirect.co.uk/base.htm : > : > : > Is there a particular advantage of the ES fitting over the bayonet : > fitting in these sorts of applications? : : Here in the U.S. 'screw base' bulbs are the norm, and I've never seen : bayonet base bulbs made for home lighting. It would be very awkward to touch : the base when installing them. The only common application we have for : bayonet type bulbs is in the automotive field. : :
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pop wrote...

Obviously not long enough or else you spent most of your time with your eyes closed!
BC fittings are standard in the UK. ES fittings are increasingly common but they are still very much in the minority. The lamp over my desk at the moment just happens to be ES purely because it's a floor mounted unit that was going absolutely dirt cheap. However (with the exception of a posey Japanese paper lamp) every other fixture in the house takes a BC bulb.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.