Wiring to a sliding shelf?

Sorry if this question is a bit off topic here, but this seemed like the best place to get an answer.
I'm in the process of building some custom kitchen cabinets, and would like
to incorporate a sliding shelf-drawer that will house multiple small appliances (can opener, toaster, blender, food processor), positioned such that each can be used in place. I'd like to have a 4-outlet receptacle in the center of the shelf, so that all 4 appliances can be left plugged in and ready for use. I would allow sufficient clearance beneath the shelf to accommodate a junction box, and would have another in the wall behind the shelf. My question regards the best way to connect them. Would it be sufficient to simply use a section of stranded #14 or #12 wire (say, from an air-conditioner extension cord), and clamp each end securely to its respective box? Or is this something that simply can not be done in a manner consistent with electrical code?
Thanks.
Joe
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Joe Befumo wrote:

Your country (and perhaps state, territory?) would help as regulations vary.
--
Sue



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USA - PA

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How about putting a plug in the wall and then mounting a plug strip to the shelf and pluging it in to the plug and secure the cord to the shelf with a zip tie....

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http://www.slide-maker.com/t2-9.shtm
seen these used with a drawer, the wiring was run through a hinged piece of square tube...one hinge at the wall, one at the drawer and one connecting the two pieces of square tube...be sure to use a flexible cord, the more strands in the wire, the more flexible it becomes.....try not to bend wire completely, leave a little loop at the end so it doesn't kink....
for inspiration go look at what they do for keyboard drawers in IT server Cabinets

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Thanks, all,
I think what I may do is put a standard duplex outlet in the wall, as suggested by Phillip, then use a hefty power strip/extension cord, but instead of using the standard strip, I'll fasten the wire to a square box with 2 duplex outlets in it -- in effect, just a recessed power strip. I'll leave sufficient wire so that it doesn't kink or bend too severely.
I liked the idea of using square hinged tubing -- if I can find appropriate components I may incorporate that as well.
Thanks again.
Joe

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