Re-trade secrets

Hey guys. Just doing a spot of surfing and came accross this tid-bit of
info. It's a long read, but is sooo relavent to this NG.
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Reply to
Steve Paris
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To summerize it of others.... It's not a trade secret once someone figures it out withnout using "improper means". Reverse engineering and accidently disclosing a trade secret are considered proper means.
Makes sense to me.
Daniel
Reply to
dbs__usenet
While we are on the subject of trade secrets, I would like to expand it to patents. The US Patent office today does not check the claims against old patents. They just grant the patent and then let the company defend it. Folks these so called patents that are out there for cylind3er locks really smell fishy to me, because they take advantage of warding (at least 1200 years old). Oh well, I'm probably wrong, but thats the way I feel about it. Check out Medeco V. Al Levy of Guarantee Lock in an import case, around 1982, 83. Medeco banged him in the Customs Court House in NY, to try to stop Levy from importing Medeco blanks made in his factory in Portugal. When Medeco rep took the stand, Levy asked him, "How much does it cost you to make a Medeco blank?". Medeco refused to answer, Levy won the judgement on the subsquent default.
Hey guys. Just doing a spot of surfing and came accross this tid-bit of info. It's a long read, but is sooo relavent to this NG.
formatting link
Reply to
Bill Halle
Regarding your comments on patents granted today you are sadly mistaken. The patent office does indeed check new applications against ALL old art, foreign and domestic. I the holder of two patents that have issued in the last year I do know what I am talking about. I have answered quite a few Office Actions. You can also look at the patents examined by pulling up those listed in the newly issued patent. BBE.
Reply to
Billy B. Edwards Jr.
Hey Billy.. one has to REALLY wonder sometimes I got a lot of clearly stamped 'made in China' door knobs in once to rekey, and they looked to be EXACT copies of a Kwikset Tylo knob. Everything except the KW name on the latch. parts fit between it and a real KW, BUT, there were metal differences, different coloring, or sharper corners between the knock off and the KW if you compared pieces. The basic shape was exact tho... --Shiva--
Reply to
me
one has to REALLY wonder sometimes
I don't think that is much of a surprise, when the patents expire anyone can make a copy. The Chinese have made a habit of knocking off popular designs. About the only thing that changes in a Kwikset Tylo is the latch design. (Tending to be made cheaper and more likely to fail.) So I doubt that there is much that is protected by patent, and the trademark protection I believe only extends to the use of the name Kwikset and the style consideration of the blank itself.
Reply to
Roger Shoaf

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