"memory" effects in a spinning rotor

http://www.oswirus.krakow.pl/cat_14/gyroscope /
A symmetric harnessed gyroscope accelerated to a given spinning frequency takes different time periods to stop, depending on the
direction of previous spins. For repeated alternating, anticlockwise and clockwise spinning, the rotation period in both directions significantly increases, which is not the case when the gyroscope is repeatedly rotated in the same direction. Using the measurements it was observed, that the time of gyroscope's rotation was significantly lengthened or shortened, what indicates that it either increased or decreased the movement resistance of the gyroscope. The presented experimental results suggest the existence of anomalous movement resistance and demonstrate that a fixed spinning gyroscope displays unusual history-dependent movement resistance effects. The effect is real, large, reproducible and does not follow from experimental errors.
The manuscript was reviewed thrice, according to the publishing procedure in "Physical Review Letters" within two year. The remarks of all the reviewers were taken into account during its correction. Because the publishing procedure for our manuscript in "Physical Review Letters" finished, we decided to publish it in Journal of Technical Physics, J.Tech. Phys., 46, 2, 107-115, 2005.
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snipped-for-privacy@gazeta.pl wrote:

That's a poor metric, because time-to-stop is essentially a bearing friction effect. Lots of things could explain that, such as bearing surface morphology or magnetization of the bulk material of the bearing.
If you're using a gyroscope, a good metric would be something like the forces experienced by the gyroscope. In this case, the fact you are using a gyroscope seems to be almost incidental. If you wish to pursue this line of research, I suggest that your next experiment should eliminate the gyroscope and only use the bearing, perhaps scaling up to a larger bearing which presumably would show a larger effect. However, I'm not sure that memory effects in bearings would be very interesting, and it certainly would not be relevant to physics.
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Those effects strongly depend on material (substance) of the rotor's disk, for example they are great for the rotor's disk made in teflon and small one for the rotor's disk made in plexiglas.
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Mark Thorson wrote:<snip>

damned right since the o.p. doesn't have a clue about gyro operation in the first place. it's terrestially mounted. the earth rotates. gyro tries to align with earth rotation. duh.
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"We cannot establish the cause of this phenomenon. We have discovered the effect and now theorists are trying to get their head round it. But this may change thinking about basic mechanics. We have run this experiment for a few years on different gyroscopes and we have achieved the same effect. " - says Mazur.
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snipped-for-privacy@gazeta.pl wrote:

how much more simple does it have to made before you understand? your gyro is rigidly attached to planet earth. you are simply observing the reaction of the two spins, earth rotation PLUS gyro, not just the gyro alone. and you wonder why you don't get published...
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We made measurements for different settings of rotor, for example the spindle of the rotor was laid horizontally. The effect always exists and is large. For the same bearings and the same dimensions of rotor we have observed different size of the effects. The effect is small if the disk of the rotor is made of plexiglas, and very large if the disk of the rotor is made of teflon.
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We made measurements for different settings of rotor, for example the spindle of the rotor was laid horizontally. The effect always exists and is large. For the same bearings and the same dimensions of rotor we have observed different size of the effects. The effect is small if the disk of the rotor is made of plexiglas, and very large if the disk of the rotor is made of teflon.
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