Dispersion Al2O3 Nanoparticles

Hi,
Someone knows any method to disperse Al2O3 nanoparticles (or nanotubes) in polymeric matriz? And which is the apropriated techniques to assesment this dispersion?
EDS?
Thanks
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Ju-BR wrote:

Conventional fillers can be processed in a three-roll mill. I don't know if this applies to nanoparticles. It is not a high-shear process.
The finest dispersions I've ever seen were made with a microfluidizer from Microfluidics.
http://www.microfluidicscorp.com /
If that can't do it, nothing will. A few cautions about these machines:
1. They are quite expensive. 2. The throughput is low. They are mostly used for expensive materials, such as cosmetics. 3. The machines make a great deal of noise. This is not obvious from the sales literature.

Conventional filler dispersion is evaluated with a Hegman gauge. Obviously, that won't work for nanoparticles.
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Mark Thorson wrote:

A dairy homogenizer might be a lower-cost, higher throughput alternative to the microfluidizer.
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Hi,
if a fluid-based dispersion is needed, ultrasonic treatment shows good results. Take a look at this company: http://www.hielscher.com/ultrasonics/nano_00.htm
Matze

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Ju-BR wrote:

For fluid dispersions..... Horizontal bead mills. I've worked with microfluidizers, bead mills and homogenizers, sand mills....... Bead mills are commonly used by the paint and ink industries. They are suitable for both aqueous and solvent based systems. They have high throughput and come in sizes ranging from 0.5L to 200L chambers. Several manufacturers make them. (I have my own preferences). They are very versatile pieces of equipment. They are not cheap! Neither are the ceramic beads that are used in them. They commonly used to disperse "nano" carbon black and "nano" metal oxides. What size is your material - as soon as I here the word "nano" - I get suspicious - everything is becoming "nano" and the definition keeps changing. Cheap fumed metal oxides are now expensive combustion synthesized "nano" particles .... etc. etc. Microfluidizers are good for low throughput - What kind of production rates are interested in?- lab work or railroad cars worth. - yes- nano particles are produced by the railroad car and have been for decades.
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