solid fuel engine

As we struggle to get energy efficient alcohol production, I
wonder if we couldn't "finely divide" simple cellulose/fibers and
inject that into an engine. Ostensibly the rpms would need to be
lower to complete the oxidation of what is fed in, because it
will no doubt be "not quite as fine as a vapor"...
Do we still require a liquid fuel for a mom-and-pop type vehicle?
Seems like this might fit well into a hybrid...
Anyone?
David A. Smith
Reply to
N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc)
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N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc) said the following on 2/28/2006 16:49:
Oh, now you're taxing my memory.
IIRC, "micronized" coal was tried in either a diesel- or otto-type ICE sometime after the 1970's energy crisis. Maybe googling will reveal something.
I don't recall the results, or if they even published something, but would guess that ash and fouling would have been their biggest problems. This would also be of concern, perhaps more so, for plant fibers.
Anyone know the ash content and heating value of dried grass clippings?
Lance *****
Reply to
Lance
Dear Lance:
Seems like you could invert the engine, so that entry and exit valves are on the bottom. That wouldn't *stop* buildup, but might prolong the inevitable.
Not much more than coal, I'd imagine.
As a sidelight, during WWII, some vehicles were run on carbon monoxide. The carbon monoxide was formed by burning coal with insufficient oxygen. Not sure how long the engines lasted, or what other problems ensued...
Google has 68 hits on: "carbon monoxide as fuel"
David A. Smith
Reply to
N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc)
Lance thought carefully and wrote on 2/28/2006 7:49 PM:
Using the Phyliis Biomass database:
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conversion factors:
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Alfalfa heating value (HHV, dry basis) = 7808 Btu/lb Ash content (wt%, dry basis) = 10.3%
Lance *****
Reply to
Lance
OK, here's the patent on burning micronized coal/water slurry in a diesel engine:
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has been assigned to Thermo Electron of all companies. I'm familiar with TE's NOx analyzers.
Here are the micronized coal people:
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say it's possible to micronize biomass, though I imagine they're talking something very friable like walnut shells.
Lance *****
N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc) wrote on 2/28/2006 8:11 PM:
Reply to
Lance
Dear Lance:
Thanks. Your recollection of "ash content" is what is key. Ignition of the material will either have to be by spontaneous combustion, or by adding a little bit of the usual fuel choices.
Soft woods have ash content around 0.5%. The paper goods in trash and sawdust have an ash content around 1.5%. I hate to see usable materials being landfilled, but we are likely talking a steam engine here. I cannot see a piston engine running for very long with "crap" in it.
Over and out.
David A. Smith
Reply to
N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc)
I had read once that the initial design of the first diesel engine was for use with powdered coal. It worked too well: cracked the block due to uncontrolled burning rate, so then switched over to liquid fuel. Wonder if it's a true story.
M Walter
Lance wrote:
Reply to
Mark Walter

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