Understanding thrust needed for set PSI

Hi all, Not being mathematically inclined I have no idea how to convert this. I've got a project that requires me to place a certain amount of down force
to some bottles. Basically enough to ensure that they are sealed while a process occurs. Say I have six bottles that will have 10 to 15 PSI in each and above that a sliding mechanism that will cork them temporarily. How much downward pressure do I need? In LBS and or in Thrust (N) ? I do no know what N means so if that could be explained that would be great. Assume I will be using an linear actuator to get this done.
Thank you,
Paul
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force = number of bottles x area per bottle x pressure
area per bottle = diameter of opening x diameter of opening x 0.785
you also need to add some extra force to get a tight seal (depends upon seal material used.) For a flat rubber seal on soft drink type bottles (small opening) I would try about 5 lb. extra per bottle.
A mechanism that provides an adjustable force would be a good idea. (air cylinder with pressure regulator is one way to do it).

force
actuator
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Dear Paul:

force
actuator
Some bottlers seal at atmospheric pressure, but have added one "drop" of LO2 just prior to capping...
David A. Smith
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I hope you found both Bill and David's responses helpful.
You had one more question that wasn't directly addressed, To 'cork' a bottle with no excess gas pressure at all, still takes a shove on the cork.
You need to specify that. Then add the cork area times the internal pressure that you are having to cork. (You will easily realise the corking force has to be greater than the force from the internal pressure, or the bottle will immediately uncork itself again....)
And you are accustomed to expressing force as pounds force as llbs (f) In the SI system, force is given in newtons, which is a force of about one quarter pound apple pressing down in your hand, or more precisely, force in pounds X 0.455 kg/lb X 9.8 N/kg = force in newtons so lb (force) X 4.46 = force in newtons, abbreviated N and force in N = force in lbs / 4.46
Thrust is another word for force.
Brian W
wrote:

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