CTE for titanium

Does anybody know where I can find the coefficient of Thermal expansion
for Ti? I would like to have it for the temperature range from room
temperature to about 1400C. I realize this includes the phase change at
~882C. All I can find in a one number fit all.
Thanks
Steve Gerdemann
Reply to
SJgerdemann
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'the coefficient of Thermal expansion for Ti' does not exist. It is a temperature-depend 2nd-order tensor. Hexagonal Ti is thermally anisotropic.
Michael Dahms
Reply to
Michael Dahms
Head for a good library.
CINDAS at Purdue University authors/publishers
#
Thermophysical Properties of Matter - The TPRC Data Series, IFI/Plenum Data Co., 14 volumes (out of print) #
Thermophysical Properties of Selected Aerospace Materials, Purdue University, 2 volumes (out of print) #
CINDAS Data Series on Material Properties, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 4 volumes, Hemisphere Publishing Corp., 3 volumes (out of print) #
Aerospace Structural Metal Handbook (ASMH), Purdue University, in both print and CD-ROM versions (available from Self-Directed Learning Programs, Center for Lifelong Learning, Purdue University) #
Structural Alloys Handbook, Purdue University, 3 volumes, CD-PDF version only (available from Self-Directed Learning Programs, Center for Lifelong Learning, Purdue University)
Reply to
jbuch
How good a number to you need? What is the intended use of the value?
MIL-HDBK-5 gives values from ~5 to 6 * 10^-6 in/in/F from room temp to 1600F.
The value is dependent on alloy; Alpha increases with temp. cheers Bob
Reply to
BobK207
I suppose I should have framed the question a little better. I would like to be able to estimate the change in height of a small Ti button with temperature. This button is NOT single crystal Ti rather it is made from powder. I am aware that the CTE constant (8.46 X 10-6 /C) I found in Donachie's book is not constant/correct. We have several good and expensive reference books about Ti but none list anything better. Unfortunately the local university doesn't have any of the books in the above post. Unless I can find a reasonable number I will try to run a few dilatometry experiments.
Thanks Steve Gerdemann
Reply to
SJgerdemann
Steve-
You can search for & download a copy of MIL-HDBK-5
It has has graphs of Alpha as a function of temp from RT to 1600F for various alloys
cheers Bob
Reply to
BobK207

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