100 amp bridege rectifier



    Hmm ... what voltage do you expect to get out of that rectifier? I calculate about 340 VDC (240 * 1.414).

    You're looking in Digikey. They are more focused on the hobby market.
    Look at:
<(Amazon.com product link shortened)>
1100 Amp @ 1600 V (I see a $147.50 price *each*, and you would need four and appropriate heat sinks, and the bolts and preloading spring washers along with the heat sink compound. (Of course, at a mere 100 A, you probably would not even get them warm -- but you have to make electrical connections via the heat sinks. :-)
    Looking through Newark's parts selector, and bearing in mind that you need at least 680 VDC reverse, the closest that I find is:
=====================================================================Manufacturer:                POWEREX Newark Part Number:            23H0078 Manufacturer Part No:            1N3295A
RoHS Compliance :             Yes Description STANDARD DIODE, 100A, 1KV, DO-8 Diode Type:                Standard Recovery Repetitive Reverse Voltage Max, Vrrm:    1kV Forward Current (AV):            100A Forward Voltage Max, VF:        1.5V Forward Surge Current Max, Ifsm:    2.3kA RoHS Compliant:             Yes ====================================================================at a price of $45.90 each. (You will need four, of course.)
    There is a major jump in voltage at that current range from 600 V to 1 kV.
    If you need that 100A surge for a very short period, you can use lower rated diodes, of course.

    No -- you need to put a small resistance in series with each diode, so variations in the forward voltage drop won't cause 90% of the current to be hogged by a single diode.

    It is -- as long as you don't expect a bridge rectifier pre-assembled.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
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I've worked with hockey pucks. You MUST use the correct Wakefield clamp; the contact to the guts within depends on you squeezing it TIGHT; the metal ends flex with the clamp.
The Wakefield clamp has a strain gauge to tell you if you have it tight enough.
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http://www.semikron.com/products/data/cur/assets/SKD_110_07913170.pdf
http://shop.ebay.com/i.html?_nkw=semikron +(skd110,+%22skd+110%22)
Make sure to use proper heatsink.
i

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Mains to DC bus is built into most ACVS inverter drives. If you could find a large, bad, obsolete drive in the trash you would probably have what you need to get the DC bus voltage. Note this is going to be over 300V DC, be careful. I've seen a lot of old model drives in the scrap bin at work, usually from an upgrade to a newer drive.
Also I think you can use an SCR as a rectifier if you connect the control lead to the correct end. I'm not sure if you need to use a resistor or not, thought someone here would know more about this.
So, on your ebay search, rectifiers, diodes, SCR's, and drives (obsolete or bad to be cheap) could do what you need. Sometimes companies stock power SCR's for their old drives, as drives are obsoleted, their replacement SCR's can end up on eBay. The newer drives I've worked with usually have IGBT's.
RogerN
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wrote:

!!!!!!!!!
I got a dead 50 hp. old old VFD in a huge cabinet. Its going to have all the parts I need. I didn't make the connection till just now.
Thanks Roger
Karl
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