48 volt car elect not going to happen

The high(er) voltage car electrical system is not going to happen anytime soon. The reasons, according to an article in Car and Driver are a) reliable
circuit protection hasn't been developed to the point where manufacturers are 100% sure a loose wire or a short won't result in a shock or fire and b) 12 volts is an ideal voltage for headlight filaments- higher voltages mandate thinner filaments which don't survive bumps and bangs very well. Apparently GM was going to 48 volts for the 2006 model year, but backed off mostly because of the circuit protection issue.
-Carl
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That suits me. Under the right conditions, 48 volts is plenty enough to kill. Therefore, one inevitable result of 48 volt electrical systems in cars will be the occasional dead mechanic. Would the advantages of higher voltage systems be worth that result?
Vaughn
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wrote:

So, what voltage do the hybrid vehicles run at? I thought is was over 100, possibly 200 volts.
Paul
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Yes, but that is "apples and oranges". (correct me if I am wrong) In a hybrid car, most of the electrics are still 12 volt, the high voltage battery just runs the hybrid part, and those wires are made very obvious.
The original post was about the potential conversion of ALL the electrics in conventional cars to 48 volts.
Vaughn
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So, in an electric car, the starter is 12 volts?
i
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On Sat, 02 Feb 2008 20:34:00 -0600, with neither quill nor qualm,

I wonder how many cheeks you'll catch with that big hook, Ig.
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when it could be turned into momentum.
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None so far, but I am waiting...
i

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On Sat, 02 Feb 2008 20:34:00 -0600, Ignoramus17662 wrote:

I thought the electric cars were hand-cranked.
--
Tim Wescott
Control systems and communications consulting
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Ignoramus17662 wrote:

We have a Honda Civic Hybrid and, best I can tell, the starter IS 12 volts, and is operated from the 12v battery. The kicker is that engine always starts with the assist motor, which operates off the 156v battery. The engine starts silently, I've never heard the starter operate. I believe that the starter is for emergency use, that is, when the assist system is not working.
Note that this system is quite a bit different from the Prelude.
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Gary Brady
Austin, TX
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Or when you can't afford replacing drive batteries late in vehicles life cycle? At least they were thinking.
Wes
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Ignoramus17662 wrote:

The Prius starts with the same motors as the traction system, so it is 300 V. They have a really UNIQUE system with two motors running on VFDs, connected by planetary gears with the engine. So, they run power from one motor to the other through the VFDs to perform the task of a transmission. The air conditioning compressor is run by a smaller motor and VFD.
Jon
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Ignoramus17662 wrote:

Once again, you've earned your name.
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On Mon, 04 Feb 2008 12:21:42 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

For symmetry, it ought to be gasoline powered. Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
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snipped-for-privacy@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
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That was a joke question...
i
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Ignoramus wrote:

Sarcasm doesn't work well online. :(
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How will 48v kill people, except for causing a fire, which 12 v is quite capable of doing that also.
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Do you own an arc welder? Look at the open circuit voltage(should be on the case somewhere). Now look at all the shock hazard warnings.
If you don't own an arc welder the open circuit voltage is usually around 48 volts and arc voltage is around 25 volts (sound familiar?) and at the right amperage that is enough to kill you.
-Carl
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Carl Byrns wrote:

You need the VOLTAGE to to push the CURRENT in order to kill someone(approx 30 mA).The human body is a very high resistance object, which needs very high voltage to provide that current. 48v ain't gonna be enough.
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"Stephen Robinson" wrote: You need the VOLTAGE to to push the CURRENT in order to kill

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ It is refreshing that SOMEONE seems to know this. However, I have a couple of reservations about your second sentence. The resistance of the body is almost entirely in the skin, which is quite high when dry. If, somehow, you got across some voltage while wet, or perhaps bleeding from an accident, the resistance could be very much lower. Secondly, the amount of current that can be lethal depends on the path through the body. The worst would be across the shoulders, which places the heart in the circuit. The path from one hand to the other, or from one hand to some lower part of the body could also be quite dangerous.
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Leo Lichtman wrote:

Agreed, I still don't think 48 v is going to be very dangerous.
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