Air compressor wiring

I am wiring my garage and am putting an outlet in for a "futre" air compressor to replace my small 110 unit. I bought 10/3 wire and plan
to use a dedicated circuuit breaker. I also bought a flush mount 4 prong recepticle.
Can I use this for an air compressor?
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stryped wrote:

Overkill. Most 220 volt single phase compressors work just fine on a 20 ampere circuit and they only need 2 12 gauge wires and ground. The cheapest standard plug and outlet is the one that looks like a normal 110 volt grounded outlet with one of the blades turned 90 degrees. See 6-20R and 6-20P on this chart: Be sure to wrap some red tape around the white wire on both ends to indicate that it's hot.
http://www.jkem.com/pictures/NEMA%20Non-Locking%20Plugs.gif
Available at any decent hardware store.
Or better yet, hire an electrician. You still scare me.
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wrote:

Never go wrong pulling 3 wire, and #10 will handle a REAL compressor.n a REAL 10HP
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You didn't say what sort of recepticle, so I'll assume you got one similar to a dryer outlet. It'll work, but you'd be better off with # 8 wire, 3-conductor plus ground.
A high-inrush 5HP compressor might draw 50 amps on start. Although # 10 will carry it without excessive heating, you'll get less voltage drop - even on a 30-50' run - with #8.
No biggie, though. I'm guessing you won't be going for a commercial grade and size of compressor, anyway.
LLoyd
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On 2009-08-24, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

I would suggest putting as big wire as you can afford. It amounts to just a few bucks, but lets you upgrade your equipment at will.
i
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On Aug 24, 2:22pm, Ignoramus18810 <ignoramus18...@NOSPAM. 18810.invalid> wrote:

I am also running number 6 wire from a 50 amp breaker for my 225 Lincoln "buzz box". I guess if someday I had a real big compressor I could run off of that?
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Ignoramus18810 wrote:

But first look at the lugs on your circuit breaker. It is pointless to buy wire larger than can be accommodated.
--Winston
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On Mon, 24 Aug 2009 14:25:02 -0700, Winston wrote:

Unless you can retrofit a bigger breaker later. I'd look at the biggest breaker I could put in the box, if I were burying a wire inside a wall. If I were burying a long run of wire I might go far bigger yet, figuring that a new box is cheaper than the cost of burying a new length of wire.
--
www.wescottdesign.com

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What 50A breakers do you have that won't accommodate #6 or #8?
LLoyd
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On Mon, 24 Aug 2009 19:16:21 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

Excellent question!
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Oh they'd accommodate #6 or #8 just fine.
Not #2 however.
:)
--Winston
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wrote:

10-3 cable is plenty for a consumer 5 HP unit that's really a 3. But if you plan to buy a *real* 5 HP or 7.5 HP unitm, run 8-3 or even 6-3 to that spot, and use a 2-gang box.
Under the old codes you could use 2-conductior wire - but you had to cheat and connect any 120V stuff in the machine to ground to work. Clothes dryers, that's how you had a 120V Light in the drum and a 240V feed.
You are no longer allowed to connect "incidental loads" of 120V (like the work light or the timer motor) between one hot and the ground - it HAS TO go to a neutral wire.
And you might want to swap around the garage and put the air compressor outside in a shed (for the noise) and put your spiffy new drill press there in the corner instead, so... So put in a neutral wire everywhere and don't fret.
--<< Bruce >>--
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You don't say how far away is the garage...and nobody else asked! Shame on them all.
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On Mon, 24 Aug 2009 23:56:46 -0400, the infamous "Buerste"

Shame on all the posts replying to this known troll.
--
So far Mr. Obama has used his personally exciting presidency for initiatives
that are spending public money on a scale not seen since ancient Egypt.
  Click to see the full signature.
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