Aluminum countertop

I'm determined to do something unique for a countertop and don't want
to spend the money on stainless steel and I want something sort of
"industrial" looking.
Maybe I'm wrong but it seems to me that 1/4" thick (or thicker) sheet
aluminum has some possibilities for a countertop.
I'd like a brushed, sealed finish and other than getting the pieces
sheared, do the top myself.
I have a metal fabricator who I'm sure can laser cut the sink etc.
Has anyone ever done this?
Any help/hints?
Hardness? 5052?
Thanks
Reply to
mkr5000
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I suspect that you will find that aluminum will scratch pretty easy. The first time you try to slide something heavy you may end up with some deep gouges. I have stainless countertops in my shop and it would take a near constant effort to keep them looking good-if I was so inclined. Have you consided cement? I've seen some nice cement kitchen counter tops.
Reply to
Gerry
5052 is fairly corrosion resistant so it would probably "ok" for a work counter top. Brushed and sealed? Maybe clear anodized. 1/4" would be way overkill. .100 if supported under the main surface would be more than adequate. If you have the front edge rolled and the back bent up and back for a backsplash it would almsot be self supporting depending on length.
I think I would pass if you meant for a kitchen countertop. If just brushed aluminum then it it would constantly get scratched, and I am not really sure if hard anodized would be a lot better. I have a mini mill with a hard anodized table and it holds up ok, but it does scratch and a cutter goes through it like butter.
I like stainless for counter tops. Its harder to work with, but will last longer than you will live.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Yeah -- a kitchen countertop but it doesn't sound like a good idea.
I've seen a little on concrete, may look into it.
Tile, epoxy paints, I've seen it all but really would like a metal look -- at lowest cost.
Reply to
mkr5000
How about stainless steel tiles?
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Reply to
anorton
On one Army base the kitchen sink counter was galvanized steel. The zinc had long since worn away, but Army coffee removed the rust that formed during cleanup. If I quickly wiped it dry it stayed shiny until the next meal.
Temporarily cover your existing counter with a sheet of aluminum and see how it wears. I have a stainless plate on the counter for hot pots. The finish has become random fine scratches.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Hard anodize. Tougher than nails and it will last a long, long time. Use a cheap grade of aluminum.
Reply to
John R. Carroll
Have you looked into available colors of laminates? They might have something that has a metallic look, but holds up like laminate. (Formica, etc.)
Personally, if I won the lottery, I'd go for butcherblock. ;-)
Good Luck! Rich
Reply to
Rich Grise
I suspect that you will find that aluminum will scratch pretty easy. The first time you try to slide something heavy you may end up with some deep gouges. I have stainless countertops in my shop and it would take a near constant effort to keep them looking good-if I was so inclined. Have you consided cement? I've seen some nice cement kitchen counter tops.
I'll second the notion of cementious countertops. There is more than one book devoted to the topic and the array of possibilities is not piffling.
If you consider the metal tile or plate idea elsewhere suggested in the thread, spend your money on Spectralock epoxy grout. Price comparison with the regular stuff will make you cringe. The durable result will make you prudently satisfied.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
Reply to
Edward Hennessey
It might work for you.
If you have any cookware with aluminum bottoms and you slide it across the aluminum countertop expect an ugly mess.
AL against AL is never good.
Reply to
Jim Stewart
I read about the spectralock grout -- if I tile definetly will use it. If I use stainless steel tiles (source?) can I install edge to edge without grout?
Also, someone mentioned HARD anodize.
What about that?
I guess there must be a durability difference in anodize coatings?
I may just play with a 2 x 4 sheet of 1/8" 5052 -- brush it (and take it to the anodizer as well).
Reply to
mkr5000
Hard Ano is so hard you can't scratch it with a carbide end mill and isn't electrically conductive. It's also pretty cheap to have a professional do it.
Reply to
John R. Carroll
But it will crack if the substrate gets deformed, so you'd want to make the sheet thick enough that it won't dent when it takes a hit.
Reply to
Ned Simmons
M:
You're posting from Google which I've blocked as a prodigious source of Spam; your posts are only visible to me when unblocked others reply.
One of the reasons for grout with various ceramic and stone tiles is to prevent their cracking.
If you use SS tiles and can get a surgical edge interfit that prevents gunk from gathering in the interstices or erosive solutions from puddling or attacking the adhesive substrate, you are a free man. And don't forget that it is "stain less" not "stain proof". My broad concern would be whether you can satisfy those conditions, with one more to mention.
Should you predict having to replace a tile for any reason, the grout line also gives you a place to attack without easily damaging abutting tiles. Design structure separate, grout does have some functional justification.
If you use Spectralock, mix what you think you'll need instead of the containerized units. If you have any mixed stuff surplused, you can store it in a cold refrigerator for some time and use it later after a warm up renews the polymerization process.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
Reply to
Edward Hennessey
Just make sure the countertop has a nice coating of lard. ;-)
Cheers! Rich
Reply to
Rich Grise
mkr5000 wrote in rec.crafts.metalworking on Mon, 24 Jan 2011 11:47:31 -0800 (PST):
Similar to regular anodizing, but thicker, and will have a brown or greenish color. It can be dyed darker colors. It's the new thing in cookware. You can have a look at wal-mart and see it on frying pans. As others have said it's brittle. If it flexes too much it will crack.
Reply to
dan
Well, he was talking about quarter inch material. In any case, 0.060" will resist anything a cooktop is subject to.
Reply to
John R. Carroll
I read about the spectralock grout -- if I tile definetly will use it. If I use stainless steel tiles (source?) can I install edge to edge without grout?
Also, someone mentioned HARD anodize.
What about that?
I guess there must be a durability difference in anodize coatings?
I may just play with a 2 x 4 sheet of 1/8" 5052 -- brush it (and take it to the anodizer as well).
Reply: Costco had an aluminum patio table this week in the local store. Maybe look at that and see how the top handles some Costco pots.
Reply to
Califbill
Hey! Diamond plate would be kewl!
Cheers! Rich
Reply to
Rich Grise
i was looking at kitchen tiles yesterday. There are a heap of different stainless steel tiles for kitchens. Neat but expensive!
Like this:
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Reply to
Dennis

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