Atlas craftsman model101 27430

I was given a craftsman 101 27430 12 in. lathe with quick change gears in
excellent shape and runs great,been learning to use the lathe.Appreciate all the
youtube videos.As I was cutting some threads the gears started jumping on the
Quadrant so I pulled it apart and noticed a crack on the Quadrant.Been trying to
find a new or used quadrant on ebay an have been unsuccessful would appreciate
any help as to where I might look.
Reply to
Tony Robles
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have the equipment needed . Got any trade schools in your area that teach welding ? Could be a class project and if they mess it up ... well you already have one you can't use so you're really no worse off .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
"Tony Robles"
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-jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
ot
You might also say where you are located. There might be some soul on RCM that is close enough to you that they could help. Another option is to ma ke one. If I recall correctly you could either hog one out of a piece of pl ate or make a weldment.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
You might also say where you are located. There might be some soul on RCM that is close enough to you that they could help. Another option is to make one. If I recall correctly you could either hog one out of a piece of plate or make a weldment.
Dan
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The broken part will be very helpful to make and align a fixture to hold the blank.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
sacramento,have a friend going to stop by to see if he can weld it up for me
Reply to
Tony Robles
tried this site an it said not available and there is no replacement for it
Reply to
Tony Robles
$295 - yikes! Definitely need to consider repair. Welding, of course, but brazing would likely be enough. Compared to $295 for a new one, taking it to a professional would be cheap.
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
my friend picked it up who is a welder by trade ,thinks he might be able to repair it,should know something by monday.Thanks for the input
Reply to
Tony Robles
been 40 years since I've done any actual welding but do have a good friend who's trade is welding and took the part with him,will know by monday
Reply to
Tony Robles
I don't remember if the quadrant on that lathe is zinc or cast iron. If cast iron any competent welder can either TIG braze or braze using a torch. The part is small enough that it would be easy to heat the entire part hot enough so that the brazing operation wouldn't lead to cracking. If the part is zinc there is available online a soldering alloy that works very well on zinc alloys. Pure zinc can be soldered with rod available from the hardware store. Done properly the soldered repair will be just as strong as the original part. All you need besides the rod is a propane torch. Eric
Reply to
etpm
thank you,I'll find out monday when my buddy gets back to .I'll relay the info.
Reply to
Tony Robles
Hard to believe any Atlas part is not on ebay. I had more luck searching on "Atlas lathe banjo"
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Reply to
Rex
From the picture here
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it doesn't look too difficult to make a stronger one from steel plate. The slots wouldn't have to be very precise, the arc could be oversize and the long one could wobble; both could be chain-drilled and filed wide enough to pass the bolt. The raised boss for shaft 26 could be a pressed-in bushing, maybe tack welded at the edges, or just a washer if handle #8 holds the quadrant securely enough. What looks like other keyhole slots for gear studs in the interior could be left off until needed.
If the straight slot comes out too wide to restrain the square on the carriage bolt #7 a hex head could be undercut with a longer step. -jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Well I am in Delaware, so not very close. But if you do not come up with a reasonable repair, let me know. I am not too far from a foundry ( cat tai l foundry ) and could get a replacement cast. I have not done this before so there would be a learning curve for me. And would not be too speedy. I think they only cast about once a month.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
Well I am in Delaware, so not very close. But if you do not come up with a reasonable repair, let me know. I am not too far from a foundry ( cat tail foundry ) and could get a replacement cast. I have not done this before so there would be a learning curve for me. And would not be too speedy. I think they only cast about once a month.
Dan
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It would be easy to make a functional steel copy with a bandsaw to cut the blank and a milling machine for the holes and slots. The copy doesn't have to be a precise duplicate; the user manually adjusts gear engagement on the quadrant by moving the studs, and the mesh to the spindle gear by rotating and clamping the whole assembly. -jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
picked this lathe up from my stepfather,he also has a milling machine that I will eventually get but it is all the way up in seattle and his health is poor ,but I' not in any hurry for that to happen,I should still have time to learn that machine when that time comes.never to old to learn.in the mean time we'll see how this goes.thanks
Reply to
Tony Robles
I did finally find this one for 295 and you are correct,yikes!
Reply to
Tony Robles
Sorry I didn't follow this whole thread, but I guess you have the idea that welding cast iron is problematic and you'll get a wide range of opinions about how it should be done. Weldors who can do it *reliably* are not that common, although people I've interviewed at Lincoln and Miller tell me that a simple job like yours can be done by most people using arc welding and nickel rods. Several other methods can work, but they require more expertise.
I agree with Jim. It's a simple piece that you could make out of mild steel. I'd have it roughed out by someone who's good with a plasma cutter (most commercial weldors) and then I'd drill and grind the slots. Space the drilled holes so you can go back and drill *between* them, overlapping the holes on each side, and you'll get most of the metal out of there before you grind and/or file. Filing to finish work like that is easier than you might think.
The result would be stronger and much more dependable.
Reply to
Ed Huntress

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