chromium nitrate

I'm looking for a few lbs. of chromium nitrate. its used in
parkerizing solution for parking guns. I'm making my own concentrate.
You can get 20 metric tons from china for pennies a lb. or I found
reagent grade for $35 a lb. on eBay.
Any ideas on places to search?
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
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BRAIN FART. I'm after nickle nitrate. I learned it can be made by putting nickle powder in nitric acid. So this isn't quite as weird, I'm now looking for nitric acid. I found this offer
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It also has a hazmat charge. Any chemical types know a cheaper source?
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Greetings Karl, I don't know a cheaper source but I do know that the nitric acid is dangerous to work with. The fumes will rust stuff very fast. Not to mention corrode your lungs too. So please be sure to wear all the saftey stuff, keep lots of baking soda close at hand, and make sure the area you are working in is very well ventilated. I used to passivate small parts with nitric acid and by using the proper precautions never had a problem with it. I did try rusting some steel with the fumes just to get an idea of what it could do though. And the warnings I had read were correct. To avoid hazardous shipping charges I went directly to a supplier in the Seattle area to get mine since I was going to be in the area anyway. Eric
Reply to
etpm
I'm looking for a few lbs. of chromium nitrate. its used in parkerizing solution for parking guns. I'm making my own concentrate.
You can get 20 metric tons from china for pennies a lb. or I found reagent grade for $35 a lb. on eBay.
Any ideas on places to search?
Karl ________________________________________________________
Would you please do some before/after pix?
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Google turned up lots of sites - mostly in China or India.
I don't think we do that here any more, Karl.
Reply to
Richard
And nitric acid is the starting point for a lot of things the government really doesn't want you doing. jk
Reply to
jk
jk fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Pshaw, JK! Nitric acid is readily available, even to ordinary laymen. You pretty much have to get it on line, and accept the cost of special shipping; but it's there.
The mention of it, though, reminds me that one can synthesize chromium nitrate from the oxide and nitric acid.
(maybe that's why HNO3 was mentioned... haven't been chasing this thread).
Thre's an outfit called "underground gadgets" (.com) that sells a lot of industrial surplus stuff, and among them, Karl, is Alodyne solution.
IIRC Alodyne contains a lot of chromium nitrate, although it also containes other stuff. It might be pressed into service for Parkerizing.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
???? I've done home-made parking, didn't use anything like that. What's your source for the weird receipe? I used manganese dioxide, phosphoric acid, a little hydrochloric acid for etching and a small wad of steel wool. That's it. No nickel, no chrome. All available from Lowes or Home Despot except the manganese dioxide, that came from the local pottery supply. If you want to do zinc parking, add a penny or a chunk of battery casing. Used a stainless hot table tray from a restaurant supply for a tank. Plenty of sites for doing military- style parking, none use nickel or chrome compounds. No nitrates, either, it's a PHOSPHATE finish.
Stan
Reply to
Stanley Schaefer
First, sorry for the brain fart, Its nickle nitrate. I'm just following the military specification: MIL-P-500002B from Aug '81
I've got a 20 gallon tank and plan on parking all sorts of items. Its a great finish, not just for weapons. No increase in thickness, holds oil and don't rust.
I ordered a life supply of MNO2 and already have a bunch of H2PO4
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Karl Townsend fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Underground gadgets carries that!
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Haven't been able to find that one. What's the advantage over the standard managanese or zinc versions that have been used for 80 years or more? Everything you list applies to the regular stuff, too. With what you have, you're ready to go as-is.
As far as doesn't rust, that's a function of the oil/grease holding ability, the iron phosphate coating IS porous and you can get a rusty surface, just not as fast as a bare steel surface. Have a bunch of rusty surplus parkerized Thompson magazines that prove that. It does make a superior prep coating for baked enamel coatings, though.
Stan
Reply to
Stanley Schaefer
BINGO! $13 a lb.
Reply to
Karl Townsend

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