clamp crossing tubing


I have sixty spots where I need to clamp a horizontal 7/8 conduit to a
vertical 7/8 conduit. Looking for a part to do this with no joy.
So far my best solution is to get two hole conduit wall clamps:
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then make a 3"x3" metal plate. Bolt one tube to the plate with a clamp,
then bolt the other tube with another clamp.
I'm looking for an easier way that don't need four bolts , two clamps, and a
plate at each joint.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
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How rigid does it have to be? How about a couple wraps of electrical tape, or nylon tie straps?
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
p,
I usually see two of these bolted together, 2 clamps-1bolt
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and a back-to-back push-in style
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but it's not very low profile.
It may be hard to find the perfect clamp if the method is not code for an electrical application.
Dave
Reply to
Dave__67
I think you're looking for a Korns edge clamp.
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Pete Keillor
Reply to
Pete Keillor
Theatrical supplies sell a wide variety of pipe clamping devices for lighting work. Cross-clamps are common; both 90 and 45 angles.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
CADDY makes clamps for crossing conduits, you should be able to get them from any electrical supply house, possibly even Depot / Lowe's. You will also have better luck finding stuff if you refer to the conduit by the correct 3/4" designation, not by the actual OD.
One possibility:
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I've seen this style in a pre-rivited pair as well:
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Reply to
Pete C.
Sounds like 3/4" electrical metalic tubing (EMT)
Take a look at Caddy Clips
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HTH rgentry at oz dot net
Reply to
Bob Gentry
$5 each????????
bit..pricey...no?
Gunner
"First Law of Leftist Debate The more you present a leftist with factual evidence that is counter to his preconceived world view and the more difficult it becomes for him to refute it without losing face the chance of him calling you a racist, bigot, homophobe approaches infinity.
This is despite the thread you are in having not mentioned race or sexual preference in any way that is relevant to the subject." Grey Ghost
Reply to
Gunner Asch
p,
Maybe this'll work:
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Reply to
Denis G.
This application could be met with a little metalworking on the OP's part. I haven't seen a hardware product like I'm suggesting, but maybe it already exists.
With 2 tubes intersecting at right angles, and the vertical tube in the foreground, place a long U-bolt around the vertical tube, on top of the horizontal member, ends pointing backward.
Now if those ends were to be bent (down) around the horizontal member, in a vise or simple fixture beforehand, they would then be pointing forward. Add a simple strap across the front of vertical member, and 2 nuts.
The (double) U-bolt is shaped in a U in both planes, consisting of 3 U-bends (the original bend, plus two that are formed simultaneously during the bending). The double-U-bolt will fit right-angle crossings in any orientation.
This should result in a fairly secure attachment, not strong enough to climb on, but a slight crush at the crossing would make the connection stable.
The simple strap could be substituted with an exaust/muffler-type to create a more secure, heavy-duty grip at the crossing.
You may name this part the W-bolt, or W-bolt Clamp.
Reply to
Wild_Bill
I guess that'd be up to Karl. Used might be an option as well. I just remember using them in pilot plant work.
Pete Keillor
Reply to
Pete Keillor
[about clamping EMT at right angles]
This makes a stitching-on-the-baseball shaped clamp; you can make the same contour with a plastic tie-wrap, if that's rugged enough.
Most lashups I've participated in have bolted unistrut to the wall and connected the tubing to THAT instead of to other tubing.
Speaking of lashups, a bit of twine and BoyScout quality lashing can do this kind of thing, too...
Reply to
whit3rd
Yep, unistrut makes a neat installation. I haven't see the fiberglass type, that's likely to be expensive stuff.
The light duty conduit clamps (two formed sheetmetal pieces secured with a screw perpendicular to the conduit) for unistrut are kinda wimpy, and they will move if pressured.
The spring nut (heavy duty flat nut plate that's placed inside unistrut to bolt to), is a much more secure method, but then another piece of hardware (or 2 or 3) is needed to hold the conduit securely in place, if the application is something different than placing conduit for wiring runs.
Reply to
Wild_Bill

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