CNC Homeshop Machining With A FADAC UMC10

typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:



    Yep. In "the old days" there would be a set of blueprints drawn up, and there were two models, one with the garage on the left, the other with it on the right, with the same cabinets, doors windows etc..     Now, with CAD software, you can have a basic house plan, which can be flipped left or right, and you can have any cabinet, window or door treatments - as long as it is in the menu of options.     And the CAD packages make it "simple" to have a "custom" set of prints with all the options incorporated in the print, rather than as an add-on.
    I recognize that I was griping about "cookie cutter" houses, all looking alike, and realized that this is not new. Nowadays, the builders/architects use the same design software, before that it was the "Book of House Plans" before that everybody had the same materials and there was but one way to make a house. -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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on Tue, 17 Dec 2013 10:46:50 -0800


Yeah, but its still cheaper to make them "the same." Less training. Trained assemblers instead of tradesmen. Standardized materials lists. etc etc...
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typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:


    Oh I have no doubts about that. "You can have any kind of countertop you want - as long as it is Granite." -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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on Tue, 17 Dec 2013 10:46:50 -0800


But... but... but... I like granite. LOL.
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pyotr filipivich wrote:

'National Homes' built entire subdivisions after W.W.II with a single floor plan. Hundreds or thousands of them per project. The would lay forms for the foundation, and one week later it was ready to move into. All lumber arrived precut, as well as all the plumbing and wiring. They worked down each block, doing the same job over and over until all the lots had homes. My dad bought one when I was in elementary school, and sold it when I was in Jr. High. We added a bedroom to it, and it was the only one different for blocks.
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19:04:59 -0500 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

"I'm upside down, my head is turning around Because I gotta sell the house in Levittown "
    Say what we will about the "'burbs", it was the first time for a lot of families that they got to own the house. Even if it was with a long mortgage.
Here's To The Crabgrass
Here's to the crabgrass, Here's to the mortgage, In fact, here's to Suburbia. Lay down your briefcase, Far from the rat race, Where nothing can disturb ya.
Uncomplicated, It's what we waited For so long in this city. Come let us go there, Live like Thoreau there, A life of sweet simplicity.
Did you set the thermostat? No, I don't know where it's at. Tuesday the Cub Scouts meet again. Walk the dog and cut the grass, Take the kids to dancing class, Jim's Little League got beat again.
Can't keep a maid here, No matter what they're paid here, The place has bad publicity. Why did we move here? Don't you remember? To live in sweet simplicity.
Here's to mosquitos, Clam dip and Fritos, To golf and bridge and scuba there. Men wearing knee pants, Women in Capri pants, Discussing what's with Cuba there.
Each big appliance Treats you with defiance, Until it finally falls apart. Call the repairman, In a week he's there, man, To knock your kitchen walls apart.
Tommy's got a bloody nose, Gotta fix the garden hose. Book Of The Month Club came today. Didn't read the last one yet. Yes you did, but you forget. Oh well, they're all the same today.
Here's Mrs. Ritter, She's the baby sitter. Tonight we're going joyously Back to the city, Where life is gay and witty, Back to the noise there, That everyone enjoys there.
Back to the crush there, Hurry let us rush there, Back to the rat race, Don't forget your briefcase, Back in the groove there, Say why don't we move there. Away from all of this Sweet simplicity
-- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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On Thu, 19 Dec 2013 01:02:05 -0800, pyotr filipivich

You didn't give Allan Sherman his due!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
Pr3jq7pf4 for the whole "My Son, the Nut" album. Because I'm not going to dig all the stuff out to rip the one song.
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"Bruce L. Bergman (munged human readable)"
typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    Sorry, I thought it was one of those "Everyone knows that". We had the LP, and I played it forever.

-- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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On Fri, 20 Dec 2013 10:11:43 -0800, pyotr filipivich

Nevehoiduvim. I cringe remembering "Hello Muddah", but I was a real fan of Monty Python and Firesign Theater. I have several Firesign albums and still play them on occasion. The early ones, All Hail and We're All Bozos on this Bus.
Entering freeway, which is already in progress. Apple Valley Condoms. If you lived here, you'd be home by now.
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I merely took the energy it takes to pout and wrote some blues.
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On 12/20/2013 11:45 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

"There was something fishy about the butler. I think he was a Pisces, probably working for scale..."
David
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typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

"I dropped a sand dollar in the jar for 'Jerry's Squids'"
-- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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21:45:50 -0800 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    IHOSHO, you've missed a lot. One of my favorites remains the "Ballad of Oh-Boy", which is a series of questions to which the response is "Oh boy":
Winters at Miami Beach     Oh Boy Scratching where you cannot reach     Oh Boy. Somebody scratching your itch.     Oh boy.
Andywway ... tastes is tastes.

    "...through the fog     doggedly!" (bark bark)     ruthlessly" ('Whatever happened to Ruth?')     "across the street and into a building!" ("Ow! my nose.")
yeah ...

-- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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On Sat, 21 Dec 2013 13:58:33 -0800, pyotr filipivich

Nick Danger, sitting in his office, listening to the monotonous staccato of rain on his desktop...
--
"Bother", said Pooh, as he chambered another round...

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On Wed, 18 Dec 2013 09:48:36 -0800, pyotr filipivich


Alright, boys, let's all sing it (in horrible disharmony, as usual):
https://se965.infusionsoft.com/app/linkClick/1031/399eb6c949dfe356/783007/fccafb24c80e7df5
Little boxes on the hillside, Little boxes made of ticky tacky,1 Little boxes on the hillside, Little boxes all the same. There's a green one and a pink one And a blue one and a yellow one, And they're all made out of ticky tacky And they all look just the same.
And the people in the houses All went to the university, Where they were put in boxes And they came out all the same, And there's doctors and lawyers, And business executives, And they're all made out of ticky tacky And they all look just the same.
And they all play on the golf course And drink their martinis dry, And they all have pretty children And the children go to school, And the children go to summer camp And then to the university, Where they are put in boxes And they come out all the same.
And the boys go into business And marry and raise a family In boxes made of ticky tacky And they all look just the same. There's a green one and a pink one And a blue one and a yellow one, And they're all made out of ticky tacky and they all look just the same.
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I merely took the energy it takes to pout and wrote some blues.
--Duke Ellington
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

I do a fair amount of 3D with CamBam, but to be fair anything I can do with 2D (2.5D) I do. For me its about the price. I tried a lot of different free and low price CAM software, and CamBam was the only one I could afford that does do 3D ok.
It's a one man show so forget arguments based on the documentation. The documentation is way behind what it can currently do. I would rather Andy work on bug fixes and new features than spend all his time writing doc files. That being said, my opinion was reversed when I started learning how to use it a few versions ago. I was frustrated by the lack of detailed documentation in some respects.
Somebody was talking about surface accuracy of a tenth. As near as I can tell the limitation here is the processing power. CamBam does 3D machining of a surface in two different manners, and that's pretty much it.
1: Waterline - It does waterline at a depth increment either as a finish (0-X roughing clearance) where it cuts the contour lines of the part only, or it does waterline roughing with (0-X roughing clearance) where it removes all material in the defined area to finishing that depth increment at the contour line. For some reason the waterline method seems to leave material I would not expect sometimes.
2: Vertical or Horizontal (scan line method) This traces the surface either with horizontal or vertical passes, and it can be by depth increment or no depth increment. No depth increment is nice for a finishing pass as it will trace the surface exactly (within the set resolution) on each pass. Using this method with boundary shapes, defined cut areas, or a cut limit based on the surface itself is modestly powerful.
There are some tricks also... For instance you can rotate the surface (and other associated geometry if needed), and then rotate the MOP back to the original position to get diagonal scan lines. The transformation matrix is pretty powerful in that respect, but there are things it gets confused at. Fortunately they are things that confuse me to so we agree not to do those. LOL.
What affects surface accuracy is of course the resolution of the surface mesh (STL or 3DS) and the defined resolution of the machining operation. In a 3D machining operation it calculates the depth of Z based on a percentage of cutter diameter along the scan line. For example with a .0625 diameter cutter and a machine operation resolution of .01 it will recalculate the depth of Z every .000625 inches. With a large operation that can be quite time consuming to calculate tool paths. The higher the resolution the longer it takes to calculate the tool paths, but the cut time is based on the run mode of the machine, and the acceleration rate. Sometimes I generate tool paths that take 45 minutes to an hour just to calculate them on my little dual core processor CAD/CAM computer. As of the last time I checked CamBam can actively use 2 worker threads for a MOP, but that's it. (I seem to think it might only use one worker thread per MOP.) More processors helps to calculate multiple MOPs at a time, but doesn't help speed up a single MOP. It can also be memory intensive. I occasionally get out of memory exception errors, but I am running it on a 32 bit OS that doesn't even address all the memory I can socket on the motherboard. I do wish that Andy had set it up to swap out to the hard drive (or maybe an external memory drive) like we used to do back when memory was expensive and the local computer gurus carried RAM in their fanny pack with their sidearm. LOL.
So in theory atleast you could possibly get scan line resolution calculations to within a tenth for a very simple small operation, but with comparable step over it might take days to generate the tool paths. More processing power, 64 bit OS, and more memory could probably help some, but there really are practical limitations. I've generated code before that has taken hours. For most of what I do with 3D I am happy to be within a .0015 for depth. As somebody else mentioned the fish don't really care. My machines aren't accurate enough to get any better than that anyway. Well, my Hurco mill is fair, but I run in CV mode with a 90 degree mode switch limit and a .003 rounding limit most of the time.
The one thing that CamBam does that also looks like 3D is engrave a polyline. With an engrave MOP the cutter will follow with the tool centered on the line at the whatever depth RELATIVE TO THE LINE you set in the MOP. This is handy for things like engraving a name on a surface. If the polyline is not defined with bulges or arcs it will follow the line using 3 axis anywhere in 3D space that the line goes. It does not have to be on a surface. I used this method to trick it into doing some 3D work before I got a 3D CAD program and learned to use 3D MOPs in CamBam. CamBam also has a nice tool to project lines to a surface. I use that with an engrave MOP as a "trick" to engrave certain types of details into molds sometimes, and its child's play that way to engrave a clients name into a mold that way.
CamBam is the best "affordable" hobby CAM program I have tried and in many respects easier to use than some more expensive programs I've had the opportunity to try.
It does not do "remaining material removal" machining. It would be nice, but I have to figure that out for myself. If it did I would have saved myself a dollar or two on broken cutters when I switch to a smaller cutter for detail work. "Remaining material removal" machining is a fairly complex bit of code to write. Constant engagement tool paths, trachoidal tool paths, etc... HSM tool paths. Those would all be nice, but they aren't in there. To some degree you can do it manually with good planning, but its not powerful enough to do it all for you and take the thinking out of the button jockey.
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jon_banquer wrote:

I have heard some good things about MadCam. The 3 axis module sells for under $1000, but you need to own Rhino also.
http://www.madcamcnc.com/start_page.html
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You should have stopped at the word "shop". L
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HAH! I was right! It's all three!
Lloyd
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Bob La Londe wrote:

That is not all that affects accuracy. Even if you have the time and computational power and storage capacity to produce g-code files with millions of data points there is still the question of whether your CNN can fluidly move to all those data points and cut the part to within .0001".
If you had a machine that could do that it is unlikely you would be using CamBam.
If you are making fishing lures and the end product conforms to the original CAD surface geometry to less than 0.002" then you are doing exceptionally good job.
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jon_banquer wrote:

The issue with producing toolpaths from meshes is not entirely about accuracy. 3d surface cutting usually requires a ton of point to point tool moves to cut the part. Ideally, at the micro level each pass of the tool across the surface should be parallel to the last pass such that the tool is constantly removing about the same amount of material. To do this with point to point moves, each point to point move in one pass should line up with the point to point moves of the previous and next pass. Creating tool moves from well constructed meshes is a way of making sure the point to point moves in each pass match up to the moves in neighboring passes.
In most cases when the CAM software people tell you that they create toolpaths from surface data what they mean is that an ideal mesh is created that is aligned with the projected motion of the tool across the surface. If you set the toolpath tolerance parameters loose enough you will still be able to see in the surface finish the underlying mesh pattern.
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