electric hoist question

I want to make an elevator of sorts for our newly acquired cabin. This is because moving any appliances in and out is a bear the way the stairs,
railings, walkways, etc. are located.
I want to make a section of handrail removable, and make a hoist maybe 48" square for lifting items like fridge, furniture, and wheelchair bound people up to the level of the porch, a distance of about 8 feet.
Total weight I would guess at 1,000# max, and that is figuring at the most, a fridge and two people. Platform would be about 250#.
So, I would put in a 2,000# capacity hoist.
Any suggestions of brand names? I imagine it would be used maybe 25 times a year.
Steve
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Most "hoists" are not legal to use for lifting people.
i
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Will anyone here who has done anything "illegal" with regards to fabricating, rigging, lifting, hoisting, etc. please raise your hand?
Did we miss anyone? ( I can't see through all the hands.)
I thought not.
Steve
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On Tue, 16 Aug 2005 14:43:37 -0700, "SteveB"

Hey Steve,
I've done lots of "illegal stuff", but usually it is a one time thing, with a definite time span and a known risk.
Exactly how much risk are YOU willing to take? A simple "assist" to answer my question would be to speak to your home owner insurance provider about your plan. If they say OK, then have at it, illegal or not, but get it in writing from them.
One simple thing that people tend to forget, especially with real property (ie...your house or cottage), is that there is no guarantee that the originator will always be the owner, and even while he is the owner there is no way that he can guarantee that he will be the only user, no matter what he tries to do to assure that.
You might be the best elevator builder the world will ever know or see, but so far as I can see to this point you have no idea of what and why. And even if you are the safest operator of such, what about your children or other family or friends "using it" without your participation or permission?
This is the last I will read or comment on this thread.
Take care. Really.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
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In the case of using hoist to hoist disabled people several floors up, two things stand out:
1) The risk is clearly that of likely death 2) the risk is to users and not to the builder.
I do take risks too, but usually to myself and not nearly as big.
i
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Okay. We've gotten off track again.
What brand of electric hoist do you like or recommend? I am going to use it to pull engines.
Steve
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On Tue, 16 Aug 2005 17:35:28 -0700, "SteveB"

I had a rough plan to build an um, engine puller myself. The idea was that first I'd remove the grill on the car, then push it up to a thing that looked a lot like one leg of a 2-post car lift with a platform that reached under the car. ;-) BTW, I have an old single-post car lift, and I've been known to climb up into the car while it's in the air to get the parts I bought but forgot to take out before raising the car. Anyway, if I had a granny in a wheelchair, I'd let her ride up and down in the car if she wanted. :-)
Wayne
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On Tue, 16 Aug 2005 17:35:28 -0700, "SteveB"

In this case go for quality not price. Yale comes to mind but there are others out there.
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX http://members.dslextreme.com/users/waynecook/index.htm
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In addition to Yale, Budgit and Coffing also make good chain hoists. Don't get to large a one. If something binds, you want to stall the hoist, not pull the mounting out of the ceiling. Build your top mount stronger than the stall force of your hoist. Also build your cage to take the stall force. A dead-man set of pins to stop it from dropping would be easy to add and greatly increase safety. (must pull on this or cage won't drop) You pay a HUGE premium for single phase. Three phase is easy to find. Do you need three phase for your shop anyway?
If you're interested, I have an old 1 ton Coffing hoist I'd sell cheap. It needs a new brake installed. I was going to fix it, but found one in great shape at an auction for less than the parts on this one would cost.
Karl
wrote:

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On Tue, 16 Aug 2005 17:35:28 -0700, "SteveB"

LOL!
I'd use something that incorporates a "Weston brake". They're found on boatlifts and chainhoists, among other things. It's a device that prevents a load from falling if the handwheel, chain, motor or whatever stops. On a boatlift, you must wind the load down as well as up. If you let go of the handwheel, it just stops where it is. That's no insurance against cable or structural breakage, so those parts would need to have ample safety factor and perhaps some redundancy in the design.
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All very valid lucid points.
This is not meant to be a daily conveyance, and that is why I put in the original post that I believe I would use it 25 times a year, and probably half of that.
It would only be used when there is no other practical way to move things in and out. I would be the only operator. It would function as any other lifting device. A very once in a while thing.
Steve
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Lifting people requires special dispensation from various regulatory agencies. I would give up on that aspect or expect to lay out some serious bread.
As for the rest, get rid of the platform and use slings.
I own a three story building with narrow halls and winder staircases.
I rigged my porch rails to be removable and hung a block and tackle off the porch roof. I've used it to lift two fridges a 40" stove, dishwashers, several yards of construction debris and about 180 10 ft sheets of 5/8" drywall.
I still use it to tote my anvil or Chinese bandsaw out of the basement.
Paul K. Dickman
On Tue, 16 Aug 2005 13:16:10 -0700, "SteveB"

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"SteveB" wrote

I used to hoist lots of heavy stuff up to the upper floor of a barn with the traditional chain hoist. What I liked about it was that it rolled along a big chunk of I beam. So you could lift a heavy load, roll it into the barn, then lower it to the floor. But you may not like a big I beam going through your cabin.
For this kind of application, particularly if somebody in a wheelchair is involved, I would go with something totally reliable and safe. This is not a time to experiment. I would look into the horizontal elevator concept. I have seen a lot of these with waterfront homes that sit on a cliff, high above the beach.
They had a set of rails. Some were made of wood, but most were metal. They would have wheels that were made to ride on the metal. A little platform with wheels was constructed on these rails. This was then hooked up to a winch of some kind.
You got on the little platform, closed the chain and pushed the winch button. And yoo were lowered or raised along the rails. This was the simple version that did not involve a long distance. For those applications, much more expensive and complicated elevators were needed.
But with eight feet vertical distance, you shouldn't have too much of a problem. Just make sure that your movable platform is rock solid and can not come off of its tracks. It might be an idea to construct a set of stairs right beside it. This would be handy in terms of providing extra security to the load when using the movable platform.
A friend of mine used to make gym equipment. He did something like this for his leg press machine. He would install casters to run on either angle iron or the corner of square tubing. And he would install these on both the top of the rail as well as the bottom. He would then fine tune the sled to slide smoothly. And this thing was solid and secure. The casters literally wrapped the rails. No way was that thing ever going to fall off.
I think that something like this would be much easier to build and design than a more traditional vertical solution.
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I did that once on a work truck. Built a mongo truck rack, with small I beam on it. Had a Dayton 12v. winch on it. Lifted a small portable welding machine in and out. It worked really slick.
On this, though, I just want to go straight up and down.
Steve
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Lee Michaels wrote:

Also make sure you have a safety brake mechanism. Easy enough to use the winch cable tension to hold up a spring loaded brake arm. If the cable snaps the brake kicks in.
Another possibility would be to adapt one of the hydraulic scissor dock lifts. Those are generally designed to handle a large load and people as well and have provisions for removable hand rails.
Pete C.
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On Tue, 16 Aug 2005 16:56:06 -0400, "Lee Michaels"
BIG SNIP

Hey Lee,
This is called an inclined elevator or inclined lift, and is as illegal as the hoist type the OP wants to make. Gym equipment falls under a separate safety category.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
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I have built two elevators for residential use , one for my boss and one for his dad
we used rebuilt tow motor masts and hydraulic power units from ebay
the safety is controlled by your fabricating skills and a one way flow valve built into the bottom oh the hydraulic cylinder
even removing the hose completely the elevators only fall at a certain rate
we also built safety catches into the side that wont let it fall more than an inch or two if the gate is open
that being said , the controls were a pita
no operation with open gates , securing the entrance and exit doors if the car is not present
making the car trigger these portal locks and making the car not run until the portal doors are closed was the biggest, gripe
I would not recommend building it for anyone else but yourself
also would not leave it operable when not present
I have seen one elevator using a chain hoist used to lift motorcycles to a loft for storage it works great but not real safe , if that little 3/8 bolt holding you to the end of the hoist chain takes a vacation.................
please post pics when your done
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| I want to make an elevator of sorts for our newly acquired cabin. This is | because moving any appliances in and out is a bear the way the stairs, | railings, walkways, etc. are located. | | I want to make a section of handrail removable, and make a hoist maybe 48" | square for lifting items like fridge, furniture, and wheelchair bound people | up to the level of the porch, a distance of about 8 feet. | | Total weight I would guess at 1,000# max, and that is figuring at the most, | a fridge and two people. Platform would be about 250#. | | So, I would put in a 2,000# capacity hoist. | | Any suggestions of brand names? I imagine it would be used maybe 25 times a | year. | | Steve
Why a hoist and not something like a scissor lift? To use a standard scissor lift you'd have to make arrangements to either lower the base of the lift to ground level, or raise ground level with a ramp. Genie lifts do what you are describing, in a platform lift, which is a telescoping beam arrangement that goes up and down. I modified one to move 200# about six feet, but you can get them in all sizes. They make gobs and gobs of different kinds of machines. http://www.genielift.com / Used might be the way to go, but I've never shopped for 'em.
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I tell ya, if one can stand the nit pickers and ankle biters here, there is a great fountain of knowledge and ideas!
Your idea is outstanding. I don't mean to pop yer balloon, but someone beat you to the idea via a private e mail.
I would have never thought of it. I looked up 2 ton electric chain hoists, and came up with about $1700 for a name brand. Plus, all the time and effort, and hassle of making something that might be dangerous at worst.
This fella says he did the same thing, and paid $1500 for it from a rental place. Heck, since it will be stationary, I can get one with a fried drive motor, so long as the scissors work okay. It's only going to be a 4 or 5 foot rise, as the lift deck is about three feet off ground level already.
So, kudos to you and the other fellow for thinking outside the box. (I would give his name, but I think he wanted to avoid the flaming going on. He knows who he is.)
We will be going to the cabin Friday, then on a trip through Northern Nevada, and up to Jackpot, then back to the cabin to meet relatives for Labor Day.
So much to do. Going to do some fancy iron work, some gates, some stair railings out of Indital stuff, just a lot.
That scissor lift is going to be handy.
And safe, too. Already OSHA approved to lift people. Guard rail. Toe kick. You couldn't ask for more.
Steve
PS: I think the other way would have been more exciting to ride on, though. But then, you're talking to someone who has actually ridden a headache ball on a crane, and a 1" line with a boot loop down from a crown block eased down by a drawworks cathead.
If'n ya know what I'm talking about ...............
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Sounds like a plan. I never thought of using a scissors lift to lift anything that high. But they lift things into the air much higher than that.
What I have used as a scissors lift is a work table for assembling wood projects and welding. Both were home made work stations. They used a hand crank and a threaded rod. But they only had to lift or lower things a foot or so for the most part.
But you are right. There is enough things out there in the world along these lines that you should be able to come up with something that meets your needs.
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