Etymological question -- "waller" a hole

replying to Martin Eastburn , Ryan O wrote:


Alice in Chains song Sea of Sorrow has the following lyrics in the chorus:
"I live tomorrow, you'll not follow As you wallow in a sea of sorrow"
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On 1/29/2014 10:34 AM, Tim Wescott wrote:

gummer arsch has wallered his own hole quite a lot the last few years.
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replying to Tim Wescott, Nickolas Crosby wrote: Checking in a few years later, but just searched this out when someone poked fun at me saying "wallered out" at work. I'm in Northern Utah and everyone that works construction/fabrication/hotrodshops, etc... all use wallered, not wallowed. Reaming out is commonly used for drilling a hole to a larger size, wallered is for when you really wiggle the drill around to work out the angles like some sort of savage.
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On 08/08/2016 2:18 PM, Nickolas Crosby wrote:

And a very good word it is, too! :)
Here we have the remnants of buffalo wallers in native grass that hasn't been broken out (plowed) as another use of the term.
--


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replying to Tim Wescott, Garth wrote: So I?ve been trying to figure up why the 20 something?s don?t know what waller means in Texas. Which leads to ream, gape, and my own word inbiggin. Using the same or bigger paddle bit makes an irregular hole in wood which doesn?t match my definition of ream. I use a #40 reamer to match drill #41 holes in aluminum which ends up with far cleaner holes and less burrs than using a 40 drill bit. I also use ream to refer to removing burrs in copper and plastic pipe cuts. Sort of sad not to find waller in the dictionary...
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replying to Tim Wescott, Garth wrote: So I’ve been trying to figure up why the 20 something’s don’t know what waller means in Texas. Which leads to ream, gape, and my own word inbiggin. Using the same or bigger paddle bit makes an irregular hole in wood which doesn’t match my definition of ream. I use a #40 reamer to match drill #41 holes in aluminum which ends up with far cleaner holes and less burrs than using a 40 drill bit. I also use ream to refer to removing burrs in copper and plastic pipe cuts. Sort of sad not to find waller in the dictionary...
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On Thu, 19 Apr 2018 03:18:02 GMT, Garth

I'm sure you'll find it in the Redneck's Dicshunary. "Wallow" is in the rest.
--
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On Thu, 19 Apr 2018 08:17:40 -0700
<snip>

Read through some of these defs:
https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Waller
More than one way to 'waller' a hole it seems ;-)
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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wrote:

The UD is a hoot, isn't it? I've used it mostly to find out what all the SJW terms meant.
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replying to Tim Wescott, Wizkid wrote: In Texas we use ?waller? out a hole to refer to tweaking the size of a too-small hole to make it ?just right? (slightly, but immeasurably bigger). I have an English degree but am not too snobby to use a colloquialism when it is fitting and succinct.
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replying to Tim Wescott, Wizkid wrote: In Texas we use “waller” out a hole to refer to tweaking the size of a too-small hole to make it “just right” (slightly, but immeasurably bigger). I have an English degree but am not too snobby to use a colloquialism when it is fitting and succinct.
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    How old is this thread? I seem to remember it popping up several times in the last few years.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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replying to DoN. Nichols, Murgatroy wrote: im tryig to get a hole in my countertop enlarged for a new Faucet handle I purchased as a replacement. The new one is too large to fit through the holes for the cold and hot stems. The plumber in North Arkansas says he can use a Dremel tool to wallow out the holes to make the new stems fit. This term was used infrequently in my life to mean exactly that in such circumstances
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On 9/6/2019 10:18 AM, Murgatroy wrote:



with a pickup and a skilsaw considers himself a handyman ... "plumbers" also own a pipe wrench . Guess where I live ? Hint : it ain't Texas .
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wrote:




And Electricians have a hammer and screwdriver!
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in message

As a kid, when staying with relatives in rural Georgia I was assigned farm chores. The depression the hogs dug in their pen was a "waller".
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