Flattening pipe for weldiing

I know I know. I should do a fish mouth!
Ok..But sometimes there are other uses for flattening the end of a
piece of pipe neatly. I have used a large hammer and the closest rock
or large piece of steel until now.
I have a pipe bender, which cam with a couple of spare 12-tonne jacks.
Has anyone made up a jig to flatten pipe end and tape the flat neatly?
I was wondering about either making an add-on for the bender, or using
one of the spare jacks to do the job.
Will a 12-tonne jack be enough for say, up to 2" water pipe etc.
**************************************************** sorry
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
c
Reply to
Old Nick
Loading thread data ...
Unless you have dozens to do then a hammer is much faster. For many ends you can use a powered press and slip a block under the flattening die alongside the pipe end. The block will act as a stop to prevent you from completely flattening the end... unless that is what you want. Randy
Reply to
Randy Zimmerman
I'm sure there must be reasons for flattening pipe for fitups, but I have difficulty with accuracy when I try to mash pipe into submission. (g)
If you are butting 2" pipe to 2" pipe (any small pipe, same size to same size), the job can be done faster and more efficiently by cutting a fishmouth in the pipe with a chopsaw or metal cutting bandsaw. Measure the inside distance and mark your pipe. This measurement represents the BOTTOM of the fishmouth. Two cuts at 30º and you're done with one end. Turn the pipe around, make sure one of the pointed ends is exactly on top, then make two more cuts at 30º.
It takes a time or two to determine the precise placement of the stock in the saw vise for the second cut, but once you make that determination, the job goes quickly. Example: .
Reply to
Tom Stovall
Yup. I made up anchor bouys (see
The bouy is fastened to the chain with a pin through a hole drilled through the flattened end of the pipe at one end of the bouy. The ring sits in the flattened end at the other end and is welded in place. The flatening was done in my 20T press but it wasn't being stressed at all. I just squeezed until a link of chain slipped into the oval nicely. I'm confident you could do your job with 12T or less.
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 13:55:13 GMT, "Randy Zimmerman" vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
hmmm...I have a few, but over time it is dozens. I also wanted to bolt a shade house frame together, and flattened ends is useful there.
I reckjo0n pressed ones a going to be neater. I can hammer, and even get both ends co--planar (parallel?) , but it's still a little ...well...hammer finish!
This is what I do not have. When I looked I realised I would have build quite a strong setup to prevent uneven forces causing trouble.
**************************************************** sorry remove ns from my header address to reply via email
c
Reply to
Old Nick
On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 08:23:16 -0600, Tom Stovall vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
Isn't that going to need a lot of filler weld? If so no worries, I am used to that :-Turn the pipe around, make sure one of the pointed ends is exactly on
**************************************************** sorry remove ns from my header address to reply via email
c
Reply to
Old Nick
On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 20:24:54 GMT, Ted Edwards vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
I'll check out the buoys at the url.
Thanks for the opinion. I tried a couple of "squashes this morning that seemed encouraging. But I must remember to firmly fasten the pipe. One piece let go, and even galv pipe has quite a bit of spring!
**************************************************** sorry remove ns from my header address to reply via email
c
Reply to
Old Nick
[deletia fore and aft]
Re: Butting same size pipe. "Make two 30º cuts..."
Butt joints formed from by 2 x 30º cuts in same-sized, light stuff do not usually need any filler. I routinely use one pass. On heavier walled stuff, I taper the inside of the "points" formed at the top of the cuts with 24 grit for a closer fit.
>If so no worries, I am used to that :-
Reply to
Tom Stovall

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.