large diameter pipe miter

Does anyone know where I can get a miter template for joining two
pieces of 8.5" OD pipe at 90 degrees. I need the same for 6.5" OD as
well. Perhaps there is a program........ or someone has a tried and
true manual method.
Reply to
Randy
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This shows you the procedure. It is really straightforward and after you have done it a few times takes only a few minutes.
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There are programs that you can purchase. I don't know if Winmitre goes that large. Someone here may have a copy and know. Randy Z.
Does anyone know where I can get a miter template for joining two pieces of 8.5" OD pipe at 90 degrees. I need the same for 6.5" OD as well. Perhaps there is a program........ or someone has a tried and true manual method.
Reply to
R. Zimmerman
Good template that I'll keep for future use but I neglected to state that I'm doing a tee connection! Do you have anything for this type of template.
Reply to
Randy
Google for "winmiter.exe" - I just tried it, whips out a pattern you roll around your pipe to lay out your fishmouth.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Grant Erwin wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com:
Also Goggle "Tubemiter", it's also free like Winmiter.
Reply to
Ken Moffett
I agree, Winmiter works excellent for small diameters, but how do I get large diameter pipe templates printed? The 8.5" template has not even half of the template on one sheet of paper. Is there a different printer setting I should be using?
Reply to
Randy
If you have or can get access to an overhead ["VueGraph"] projector, print a template for a 2" connection on transparency film then use the projector to enlarge it to scale. Tracing the outline will provide the working template.
An opaque projector can also be used - these can often be found at garage sales.
For an 8.5" pipe you'll be looking at a minimum of 2' of template.
Now if you only had a continuous-feed impact printer or one that could utilize "Banner Paper".....
Reply to
RAM³
What I might try is to dump it to PostScript ("print to file") and sneakernet the file to Kinko's and have them print it on large paper. No matter what, it has to go onto large paper somehow. Although I'm curious about what happens if you try it, maybe it will just print on 2-3 pages so you can cut it out and tape it together accurately enough?
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Probably the handiest steel layout tool I own is the CONTOUR MARKER pipe and structural layout tool made by CURV-O-MARK. It will do this job in less time than it takes to talk about it.
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It is a very pricey tool but once you have used one you will be spoiled and will wonder how you ever got along without it. It is well made but is also lightly built and looks like it is very fragile. I have never broken one but I am VERY careful not to leave it lying around and do not lend it out.
MAKE SURE to also get the structural adapter which is very handy for laying out cuts (especially angled) on wide flange beams or angles and other odd shapes. It will scribe a line right around all surfaces of a wide flange beam, and with a little fiddling will work on a very large sized or odd shape.
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They are available from good industrial welding supply houses and do sometimes come up used as most people do not know what they are or how to use them. This tool should be at the top of every welders want to scrounge list and while the price will make you pause, if you have a need to do any significant amount of pipe or structural layout this tool will pay for itself easily.
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Google
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Reply to
Private
"Randy" wrote in news:1155652154.815835.138730@ 75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com:
Randy,
I just ran a 90 degree joint for two 8-1/2", 1/4" wall (converted to mm) pipes on Tubemiter. It runs the print lengthwise on the paper. The longest standard paper on my printer is 8-1/2x14", so I printed it twice. Folded the prints at the peak, to locate the two end points of 1/2 of a full template. Then taped the two halves together. It just fit on two sheets. Looks like it should work. I'm not sure if there are printer paper setup that will let you select an 8-1/2"x(really long) paper.
Ken
Reply to
Ken Moffett
If you are doing a Tee intersection all you do is draw a circle or half circle instead of that diagonal 45 degree line. Try this site :
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Google parallel line development, pipe intersection. There are lots of hits. It really is nice to be able to do this on the shop floor on in the field. It's a oneupmanship thing.
The programs you can buy for the job are nice if you are into a lot of it. They will even compensate for the thickness of your wraparound .
Reply to
R. Zimmerman
Many of the ink jet printers can take roll paper. You will only find photo paper for sale in rolls at most of the stores with the printers, but you can find regular paper in rolls at a good paper store / supplier. A few of the stores with the printers will actually carry the "banner" roll paper and you can also order it from the printer manufacturers.
Pete C.
Reply to
Pete C.
I forgot to mention that I'm working in the Indonesia........ no fancy tools around here!!! Ken, I tried to alter the printer settings to print longer paper but he best the printer would print is 14" long prints ( roughly half of the template). I ended up doing it the manual way using the "parrellel line development" web site instructions (an instruction that I'll keep for future use). Thanks for the help.
Reply to
Randy

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