Miter Gears

I am looking to make a couple of tables that raise and lower. Each would have a handle at one end, which when turned lifts or lowers the top. The proposal is to use 2 screws linked to the handle shaft by a 2 pairs of miter gears.

I am having trouble finding an econmical source for suitable miter gears. They do not need to be high quality or extremely large, but need to accept/have up to a 3/4" diameter bore. They could even be a strong plastic. Anyone have a suggestion where I could find something suitable; preferrably in Canada?

Reply to
distracted
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Could you use spider gears out of an old differential? Randy

Reply to
Randy Zimmerman

Both Browning and Boston Gear sell such critters here in the States. I can't imagine you couldn't find them in Canada as well. They tend to come with stock bores and are not heat treated so they can be modified to your particular requirements, or used as they come. You could probably select a gear of the right diameter and bore size with a little luck. Here's a link to one supplier:

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If you don't find what you're looking for here, do a search for "miter gears" on
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where you'll find a large number of suppliers that sell online.

Harold

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Harold

Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos

"distracted" wrote: I am having trouble finding an econmical source for suitable miter gears. (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Old car jacks?

Reply to
Leo Lichtman

Boston Gear makes nylon bevel gears in a limited range of sizes. For example, a GP1632Y is a 16DP, 32T gear with 1-

1/4 dia hub. Motion Industries shows them in stock at around $6US each.

Someone else mentioned car jacks as a source, and trailer tongue jacks are another. You may also be able to use the nut and screw, or the whole jack.

Don't forget that a two-screw lift isn't very stable. If your load is small or is always centered you're probably OK. A more stable arrangement for eccentric loads (other than 3 screws in a triangle) would be a scissors lift (see Southworth lift tables) or a parallelogram arrangement. Each has advantages and drawbacks.

Ned Simmons

Reply to
Ned Simmons

Is it possible you may be able to use a worm and worm wheel? You could make those on your lathe probably quicker than you can find the proper miter gears you're looking for. Ken

Reply to
Ken Sterling

I used to work where the main computer console table was as you describe, except they used a link chain and a removable handle. The chain wrapped around sprockets on 4 jack screws within the table top and raised and lowered the top about 18". It was a fairly substantial table, the computer monitors were pretty heavy as was the card reader and other gear. The rear jack screws had square ends recessed on top, the crank fit either one. It was set up with such substantial movement so the operators could either work standing or in an office chair. Management didn't allow lounging around so they were run to the top and the crank handles kept elsewhere.

Stan

Reply to
stans4

Go to a local RV supply store and ask for a cataogue on trailer jacks. They all come with bevel gears and worm drives exactly like you described. Bugs

Reply to
Bugs

Thanks to all who posted ideas to my request for info on sourcing miter gears. Thanks! Eric

Reply to
distracted

Two ideas: Volvo screw jacks are quite nice.

My Craftsman tabletop 12" planer has bevel gears and two vertical screws.

Ken Grunke

Reply to
Ken Grunke

That's an extraordinarily generous offer, Ken.

R, Tom Q. Remove bogusinfo to reply.

Reply to
Tom Quackenbush

Indeed. When I bought my wife a 84 Volvo some years ago, it was missing the jack. I believe I paid $5 for two of them at the local wrecking yard. One remains in her car, and the other, slightly modified, works in conjuction with my Simplex jack for lifting purposes.

Gunner

Reply to
Gunner

something

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has them for $25 each on there online catalog

Reply to
tim

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