Power Steering Pump as a Hydraulic Pump?

Does a standard GM Power Steering pump put out enough pressure to drive say a ram in a hydraulic press? If so, what HP motor would be needed to drive
the pump? Pulley ratio? Anyone been there done that? :-)
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I know the ZF pump in my older BMW is considered bad if it can't make better than 1400 PSI with the pressure gauge stuck right on the output.
ZF made the power steering in lots of different cars, so it is possible that there is one of those in a GM car.
-- Joe
-- Joseph M. Krzeszewski         Mechanical Engineering and stuff snipped-for-privacy@wpi.edu              Jack of All Trades, Master of None... Yet
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A company makes a hydraulic powered winch for vehicles. I considered getting one for my old '82 Chevy Diesel 1/2 ton, but didn't. They tapped off the high pressure line on the power steering pump and ran a winch rated at 12,000 lbs, if I recall correctly.
Since the pumps run a single v-belt, the power is less than 10 hp.
Remember, the pressure may be high, but the volume is limited. you need to think about your application requirements.
Paul
snipped-for-privacy@blargh.wpi.edu wrote in message wrote:

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MileMarker hydraulic winches run off the power steering pump of the vehicle... there is some flow & pressure information listed that should give some idea of what a stock pump is capable of: http://www.milemarker.com/winch-9.html David

say
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say
The reservoir volume will generally be quite small unless you fab up a new tank...........
Unless you are using double acting cylinders, you will need to take this into consideration.
As to horsepower, IIRC, that is an energy / time measurement, one horse can do the same work as two, it just takes a longer time is all--this is where your pulley ratio comes into play.
--

SVL




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I built a tubing bender for square tubing with a power steering pump from a ford truck. It uses a 2.5" cylinder and will bend up to 2"x2" HSS into a 90 degree bend. After that it slips the belt and stalls the pump. Not bad for free. I run it with a 1/2hp 1825 rpm electric motor at about a 1:1 ratio. The resevoir may have to be enlarged to move a bigger ram. They develop enough pressure but they are not that fast. Let's see, 2.5" cylinder, 8" stroke takes about 6 seconds to extend. Should put it in the range of 1.7 gpm.
Jason Marshall
On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 13:33:07 GMT, Marty Escarcega

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[posted and mailed]
snipped-for-privacy@mb.sympatico wrote in wrote:

Very cool. Might you have pictures or a sketch of your design? My intention is to make the hydraulic unit portable, in otherwords be able to move it from my Hossfeld style bender to the hydraulic press. Would be interested in seeing what you did for the design of your bender. Perhaps you can take some photos and post them in the RCM Drop Box?
Thanks Marty
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On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 13:33:07 GMT, Marty Escarcega

You mean like this? http://www.motherearthnews.com/menarch/archive/goto.asp?article 1/091-102-01&IDa62&Num=6 Or just in case: http://snipurl.com/4oc8
Ron Thompson Was On the Beautiful Mississippi Gulf Coast, Now On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space Center, USA
http://www.plansandprojects.com
The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools. --Herbert Spencer, English Philosopher (1820-1903)
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say

When I was a kid - some 35-40 years ago - we used to use an Oldsmobile P/S pump to run a snowplow lift cylinder on a pickup truck.
There were a number of snowplows out there with a hand-pump hydraulic unit similar to a bottle jack or Porta-Power that we would convert for a few dollars.
The Olds P/S pump developed 1300 p.s.i. and did a very adequate job.
OTOH - my Pro-Tools tubing bender uses a foot-pedal-operated, air-over-hydraulic pump that develops 20,000 p.s.i.
You should be able to come up with something in between for your purposes.
Use "mechanical advantage" that hydraulics can offer. 1300 p.s.i. applied to one-square-inch of piston area will result in 1300 pounds of force from that piston.
The same 1300 p.s.i. applied to a two-square-inch piston area will result in 2600 pounds of output force.
Etc, etc, etc.....
Of course, twice as much fluid will be required to move the two-square-inch piston the same distance as the one.
Bob Paulin - R.A.C.E. Chassis Analysis Services
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On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 13:33:07 GMT, Marty Escarcega
......and in reply I say!:
Depends what you mean.
I was under the impression that steering stuff puts out 1000-1500 PSI, whereas "hydraulic cylinders" a la FELs etc use 2000-3000 PSI.
I also thought that jacks, and cylinders in porta powers are rated for much higher pressures, to keep size down for a given push.
For instance a 10 tonne porta power has a cylinder that is about _maybe_ 1 1/4 inches in diam. This equates to around 8000 PSI to get 10 tonne. 10,000 PSI rating comes to mind for these machines.
On the other hand the jack in a 12-tonne press is maybe 2.25" diam. This brings it back down to the 2500-3000 PSI mark.

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Old Nick wrote:

Power steering pumps can span a big range from as low as 800 PSI up to 3000 PSI . It is real easy to tell the high pressure ones as they look like reg hydralic pumps . Had a high pressure one on an 86 Chev 4X4 dually . It blew hoses real regularly and also powered the power brake unit . It is not hard to up the pressure on the reg style though .
http://www.off-road.com/~jweed/pwrstr.htm
It does not take much time .
Ken Cutt
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vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
OK. Interesting. I suppose press work is not exactly heavy-duty. BUt you are placing the pump under pressures it was not meant for.
Anyway, thanks for that.

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Most power steering pumps have spring loaded valves to prevent over pressurization. The intermitent duty of press work should be no bother to the pump. Besides, they are everywhere and cheap. If it dies, it dies.
Ron Thompson Was On the Beautiful Mississippi Gulf Coast, Now On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space Center, USA
http://www.plansandprojects.com
The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools. --Herbert Spencer, English Philosopher (1820-1903)
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On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 13:54:20 -0600, Ron Thompson
......and in reply I say!:
The whole point of the posted site was to "adjust" the valve with washers to cause vast overpressure. <G> That was my concern.

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Heh, heh! I haven't done it to a power steering pump but my buddies did it to an engine oil pump. Any idea what 200 psi does to the average screw-on oil filter? Especially with the hood off to NOT contain the resulting spray? You should have seen the looks on their faces. LOL!
Old Nick wrote:

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vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:

Old diesel sump oil? <G> **************************************************** sorry
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On a relate note, can a steering pump be used as a light hydraulic motor? What could one expect as to power and RPM?
Steven Harris Everson, WA
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On 25 Feb 2004 09:01:46 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@nas.com (Steven) wrote:

I don't think motors and pumps are one and the same type of beast. Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com Opinions expressed are those of my wifes, I had no input whatsoever. Remove "nospam" from email addy.
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On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 20:32:44 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Roy) vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:

I couldn't find any mention of hydro pumps and motors etc. Can you give us a lead which susbtitle?
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