Free - Foundations of Mechanical Accuracy

I factor in the knowledge gained from fixing something I didn't previously understand, if relevant to the stuff I own or want to buy.
For example the repair instructions for the HP6110 3-in-1 printer I was given say to swap it for a less troublesome newer model, but I found that Mass Air Flow Sensor cleaner works fine to restore the clouded front surface mirror.
-jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
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State-of-the-art stuff. Is there a rule similar to Moore's Law for tech? Everything has made fantastic jumps since I was playing around with it in the late '80s, that's for sure.
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A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
-Robert A. Heinlein
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Once tech reaches Good Enough the improvements slow way down. Maximum CPU clock speed leveled off around 4 GHz quite a while ago.
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I doubt most people would recognize a Boeing 707 airliner or an F-4 Phantom fighter built in 1958 as being a quaint half-century-old antique, and today's models aren't even faster. -jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Here's a great talk about Moore's Law that also uses a long detailed aircraft history analogy to talk about that "Good Enough" barrier:
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A quote from the middle:
These are the victories of good enough. This stuff is fast enough.
Intel could probably build a 20 GHz processor, just like Boeing can make a Mach 3 airliner. But they won't. There's a corrollary to Moore's law, that every time you double the number of transistors, your production costs go up. Every two years, Intel has to build a completely new factory and production line for this stuff. And the industry is turning away from super high performance, because most people don't need it.
Certainly the first half of if it is going to be relevant to people not in the original audience of web designers. The author has a smooth insightful way to mock things.
Elijah ------ one of the newest talks compares ham radio to the internet
Reply to
Eli the Bearded
Love the 2045 blurb: --snip-- And if you think that the purpose of the Internet is to BECOME AS GODS, IMMORTAL CREATURES OF PURE ENERGY LIVING IN A CRYSTALLINE PARADISE OF OUR OWN INVENTION, then your goal is total and complete revolution. Everything must go.
The future needs to get here as fast as possible, because your biological clock is ticking!
The first group wants to CONNECT THE WORLD.
The second group wants to EAT THE WORLD.
And the third group wants to END THE WORLD.
These visions are not compatible. --snip--
If they're doing it now, they likely have the most advanced AIs in existence and are predicting human behavior, investing in up and coming market trends. Wall Street and D.C. would pay a bundle for one.
Waves?
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A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
-Robert A. Heinlein
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Larry Jaques on Wed, 17 Jan 2018 22:29:38 -0800 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
I remember back when Google wasn't a bad search engine, either.
I downloaded a book - massive tome, which had the passages I was looking for. But the scan which had all manner of gibberish in it. Bad OCR. Really bad. Plus many pages where column A is preceded by column B, followed by Column C. Fortunately, I found a PDF scan (with pictures) so I could start sorting it out. Like I need another project.
-- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although far too often, Age travels alone."
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
OK, for words, that may be one measurement. The test was for "lexical decision tasks". What about identification of threats? Smells? Too bright of a light? Now watch this guy shoot 2 balloons in 0.02 of a second. Tell me how many synapses fired to make that happen.
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Jerry Miculek can draw, aim, & fire 8 rounds on multiple targets in under a second after identifying a beep. How many synapses?
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Cupstacking, anyone?
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So, obviously, there are differences in mental/physical task speeds. I lean toward thinking that the brain works in the megaflop speeds, myself.
As Moscoso said at the end, when he saw the article, he doesn't think there's an upper limit, even in the lexical realm.
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A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
-Robert A. Heinlein
Reply to
Larry Jaques

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