Graphic Language for Machine Tool Setup

Hey.
There are graphic languages for welding, showing anotations on blueprints, and languages for schematics of piping and ladder diagrams
for hydraulic, computer, pneumatic, and other fluidic logic.
Is there a graphic language for machine tools?
Two approaches, two things to express:
1) Configuration: "Set up the rotary table in the center of the mill bed and index five slots radially."
2) Work flow: "Rough the spindle on the lathe, grind to fit the bearing, and slot the key on the shaper."
Recent reading in KSRM (Kinetic Self-Replicating Machines) convinces me that while it is well accepted that a serial, compact notation for machine tool configuration and work flow would faciliate self-replication (my specialty), I have found no such graphic language or compact notation. We are bogged down in blueprints with unnecessary detail distracting from the view needed for replication.
Degrees of freedom can be described readily with graphics. There's no need to draw a blueprint of the whole machine; a lathe is "merely" a constrained headstock with a powered rotary DOF and essential no others, while a lathe carriage or mill ways are "merely" independent, orthogonal, linear degrees of freedom. Graphic communication of the existence of a stop or index in a DOF might be an arrow to a cross line for a stop, or an arrow to a point for an index. Things like that. A lot like the GDT symbols, but not applied to blueprints, merely standing alone. An alchemy of machine tool potential and operation.
Things like stiffness, mass, and feed or power input might be shown in a little matrix of low-precision numbers in suitable units.
Some combinatorics are in order, and relevant:
0 DOF: The relationship is rigid. Work in vise.
1 DOF: Must be either but not both of one rotary or one axial DOF. Ram motion, rotary table, spindle, punch.
2 DOF: Can be either two linear, two rotary, or one linear / one rotary. Powered spindle stroke on mill or DP, end mill flute grinder setup, lathe carriage and cross feed, mill table, drill press cross vise, rotary table on fourth axis tilt fixture used for machining turbine blades.
3 DOF: Combinatorically, this can all be set down. The full potential of all 11 coordinate systems appears here, but we'd usually think of cylindrical, spherical, and Cartesian.
6 DOF: Item is free and unconstrained. Work in transit, and work to which equipment or jig is fastened to guide other work, perhaps.
Maybe a little XYZ system for linear contraints, and a little cube with circles on it for rotary contraints, or something like that. Just a sketch language for hashing out how things are fixed and free, and how they are powered, fed with screws or rams or a handle, and what cuts, and what holds or guides the work. Should be applicable to everything from molding ash quarter round on a table saw or filing the end of a cut rod square by hand without a vise, to turbine blades and profiles of titanium hip implants.
Doug Goncz Replikon Research Falls Church, VA 22044-0394
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My language can get pretty graphic when setting up machine tools ... oh, wait, that's not what you're talking about!
:)

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Heehee. (giggles) So can mine! ;)
I'm talking about drawing what the machine does, not what it is, I think. Focussing on the verb, the action, the motion, and the process, rather than the casting, the bearings, the feedscrews, and the handles, in schematic rather than realistic form.
Doug
Andrew H. Wakefield wrote:

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says...

"Keep all animals and small children away from the machinst while he is at work." Or at least stopper their ears when nearby....
Jim
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wrote:

Which is sometimes harder than it might appear. While my granddaugher is only 2...she is not much of an issue yet..I have cats who love hanging around while Im working..and I have one that insists on sitting on the lathe watching the chips coming off. So whenever Im doing stainless..I put him in the house. I had this absolutly horrifying mental picture of him reaching for a stringer coming off the work..and getting hung..and spun at 1000 rpm wrapped in razor sharp stainless steel ribbons....
cringe.......
So I put him in the house. Then he sits in the window above me and watchs. But at least he is safe.
Gunner
The aim of untold millions is to be free to do exactly as they choose and for someone else to pay when things go wrong.
In the past few decades, a peculiar and distinctive psychology has emerged in England. Gone are the civility, sturdy independence, and admirable stoicism that carried the English through the war years . It has been replaced by a constant whine of excuses, complaints, and special pleading. The collapse of the British character has been as swift and complete as the collapse of British power.
Theodore Dalrymple,
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You might be surpised. My daughter was about that age in day care while ms mulligan was still practicing. Apparently something untoward came out of her mouth at one time (apparently she thought the phrase meant "THANK you...") but it was an eye opener because we both knew she had not heard it at home - we were actually quite careful about language when she was at a tender young age, so there really was only one place for her to have picked it up.
Kids listen *all* the time. They watch even more than they listen, too.
Jim
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wrote:

On that..I agree. I believe Cheyanne's first word was " Fuck". Clear as a bell. Sorta set everybody in the room back a step..
She likes to watch Poppy (me) doing Stuff. She was a bit put off at first by the noise of the machines at first..but now when she hears em..even from inside the house..she runs to her mom or my wife and wants to come outside and watch.
Ill have her welding, turning, milling and whatnot by the time she is 10. While the rest of the family got her girls toys..I bought her one of those Fisher Price workbench thingies with the plastic bolts you screw in and whatnot. She now puts in the bolts the right direction every time, even with real one. Damned shame her dad never could remember "righty tighty...lefty loosie"
Ill wait another year or so before disellusioning her by handing her a left handed bolt and nut..... <G>
Gunner
The aim of untold millions is to be free to do exactly as they choose and for someone else to pay when things go wrong.
In the past few decades, a peculiar and distinctive psychology has emerged in England. Gone are the civility, sturdy independence, and admirable stoicism that carried the English through the war years . It has been replaced by a constant whine of excuses, complaints, and special pleading. The collapse of the British character has been as swift and complete as the collapse of British power.
Theodore Dalrymple,
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LOL. I have that cartoon on my door here at work, the two guys in the dungeon with the prisoner on the rack. The one standing off to the side is telling the guy running the capstan on the rack "righty tighty...."
Give her her own safety glasses and a toolbox to keep her tools in.
Eventually she will realize that your tools are her tools - as long as she puts them back each time.
Margaret is not running machinery at this point - but she did teach her science class to solder and the all made LED flashlights as a project....
Jim
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You take one lousy week off to join Thorax at the Elvis concert, and this
22:36:54 GMT in rec.crafts.metalworking :

    I punched a hole in the freezer, and let out the coolant. Oh frap. All present gather round, and stare at the refrigerator. And from about waist high I hear a "Well, Shit!" from the god-daughter, age three. I didn't mention it then, but later I did admonish her parents about language use ...
tschus pyotr
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pyotr filipivich.
as an explaination for the decline in the US's tech edge, James
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On 7 Jan 2006 04:39:09 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

======================While things may have changes [and most likely have] I was always taught that only product specific items belonged on the part drawing. E.g. "1/4X20 2A thru" not drill w/ #7 drill and tap with 1/4X20 2A.
It was up to the shop as to how the 1/4X20 2A was obtained. Processing information belonged on the operation/routing sheets, which described the order in which the operations are to be done, special handling, the machines to be used, feeds, speeds, fixtures, settings, special tool numbers, etc. Where a specific type/grade of off the shelf tooling was required it should have a tool number specified on the op sheet rather than a specific brand name.
Stability of your product will depend greatly on the stability of the processes, which in turn rests on the detail [and enforcement] of the routing/op sheets. While this can be a major PITA, it is less of a PITA than trying to track down why you can no longer manufacture a product to spec. when you have late orders for the same.
Complete product specifications including op sheets and routers are required for ISO9000 and any of the major manufacturers own quality programs such as Q1 or SPEAR.
If you can't remember what you did, it is tough to improve, or even duplicate it.
How big is your shop [number of employees?] One indication of a potential problem is if you depend on "Karl." A "Karl" is the employee with a good [or lucky] memory that knows which machines running which tools at which feeds/speeds to use for any given job. The problem is what do you do when "Karl" is run over by a streetcar?
Contact me off list if you would like to discuss this further.
Uncle George
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Thanks, but really I just want Karl's phone number.
F. George McDuffee wrote:

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There is some work well underway on a Graphic Language for manufacturing. See http://www.stepnc.com . Although their stuff is really wordy, it boils down to the machining data will be included in the design CAD file. It will take a special machine control to accept the Cad file, and the operator/setup guy will be able to adjust for operating conditions (like APT)
JohnB
On 7 Jan 2006 04:39:09 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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Thanks, JohnB, for stepnc.com. It may just be what I am looking for, saving a lot of effort.
Never, never, reinvent the wheel!
Doug
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