Grizzly bandsaw blades

I ran low on 64-1/2" blades and ordered some from Grizzly, since they
also had a Morse #3 arbor to fit my ancient horizontal mill. Has
anyone had good or bad experience using their $25 bimetal or $12 tool
steel bandsaw blades to cut mild steel?
Jim Wilkins
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Loading thread data ...
I didn't get them from Grizzly but I have used bimetal blades on my little 4 x 6 for years. I bought the last one from Home Depot as I remember.
Bob Swinney
I ran low on 64-1/2" blades and ordered some from Grizzly, since they also had a Morse #3 arbor to fit my ancient horizontal mill. Has anyone had good or bad experience using their $25 bimetal or $12 tool steel bandsaw blades to cut mild steel?
Jim Wilkins
Reply to
Robert Swinney
e 4 x 6 for years. =A0I
I had been using Lenox Diemaster 2 blades welded at the store, with good tooth life but not so good weld life, so I am trying different suppliers. This area has turned Yuppie and most of the local industrial suppliers have closed.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
tle 4 x 6 for years. =A0I
I usually order Morse bimetals online from MSC or Enco, whoever has them on sale, but I think the next batch I'm going to try a different tooth count. The 10-16 variable pitch are fine on thicker stuff, but I shear off too many teeth on thinner material. Debating whether to go with a simple 16 pitch or maybe an 18...
Not had any problems with the welds, at least. --Glenn Lyford
Reply to
Glenn
I tried using an 18 TPI blade for everything including thick steel lying flat. As expected it was very slow, and I think the teeth dulled early from rubbing rather than cutting. I've had pretty good luck with a 14 TPI on thick and thin steel and aluminum. For really thin stuff I lower it by the tightening knob manually, sliding my hand down my pant leg for friction to increase control.
Jim Wilkins
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I tried using an 18 TPI blade for everything including thick steel lying flat. As expected it was very slow, and I think the teeth dulled early from rubbing rather than cutting. I've had pretty good luck with a 14 TPI on thick and thin steel and aluminum. For really thin stuff I lower it by the tightening knob manually, sliding my hand down my pant leg for friction to increase control.
Jim Wilkins
You need a big enough gullet to contain the chip until the gullet and tooth clear the end of the cut. If the chip packs up it will cause the blade down pressure to be thru the chip rather than the tooth and will in turn cause the tooth to float rather than cut properly.
The chips coming out should look like little '9's or '6's if the blade is cutting properly.
John
Reply to
John
I had been using Lenox Diemaster 2 blades welded at the store, with good tooth life but not so good weld life, so I am trying different suppliers. This area has turned Yuppie and most of the local industrial suppliers have closed. ---------------------------------------------------------
Probably their blade welder. I have been told some of the cheaper blade welders have trouble with bimetal blades.
Reply to
Elliot G
There is a 6 - 10 TPI blade in there now which does exactly that. I use the right tools when I need to get the job done, but learn more by experimenting around the limits of what works and what doesn't, pushing the envelope as the pilots say. It can mean being able to do a job slowly on the equipment I have rather than sending it out, not an option for overdue secret prototypes or home hobby work.
One such limit-push was discovering that a saber saw blade still cuts thin stainless after all the teeth have stripped off, if I push hard enough to heat the blade red.
Jim Wilkins
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
There is a 6 - 10 TPI blade in there now which does exactly that. I use the right tools when I need to get the job done, but learn more by experimenting around the limits of what works and what doesn't, pushing the envelope as the pilots say. It can mean being able to do a job slowly on the equipment I have rather than sending it out, not an option for overdue secret prototypes or home hobby work.
One such limit-push was discovering that a saber saw blade still cuts thin stainless after all the teeth have stripped off, if I push hard enough to heat the blade red.
Jim Wilkins
That is what friction saws are all about, they run upwards to over 1200 feet a minute and melt their way through the metal. They come in both bandsaws and circular saws.
John
Reply to
John

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.