ground fault

the 220 volt pressure washer quit...
ground fault unit would not reset at all. Couldn't find anything else
wrong. The dang thing is maintenance free, all potted in resin. So, I
cut it loose and got the washer running. No sign of trouble now.
How do I find the fault, or determine the ground fault unit itself
failed? We often wash on wet concrete. The better half does most of
the washing and its considered bad form to electrocute your honey.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Loading thread data ...
Replace the gfi. If it tests and resets, then trips under use, you can look for the fault. If not, it was probably the gfi.
Pete Keillor
Reply to
Pete Keillor
Especially if it's revealed you disabled a safety device... Hope you find the problem and fix it!
Jon
Reply to
Jon Anderson
Note the "220 volt", it's not a simple $15 GFCI receptacle.
Measure ground current with a good DMM. Start with a clamp probe to ensure no large current, then if good, put the ground on the series amp connections of the DMM to measure low level current. GFCI supposed to trip at something like 5mA.
Reply to
Pete C.
Pete, maybe I misunderstand how ground fault works. Do I just look for micro currents in the ground wire? Seems to me you could still have a fault that exits through the machine frame and not see anything in a ground wire test. After all if the ground wire is taking up any fault, the operator won't get a shock.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Folow up. It would makes sence to me to put the washer on a rubber mat and force any stray currents through my ground wire. Am I seeing it right?
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
The ground fault unit is bad. Right now I'm searching for another that goes in an extention/electric cord. No joy so far.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
A 240V cord mounted GFCI unit will be pretty obscure. Try the manufacturer of the PW unit, or look to a GFCI unit intended for a spa.
Reply to
Pete C.
Put the $60 one in a box with a receptacle and plug. Use inline with your existing cord.
formatting link
Leviton
-- It is characteristic of all deep human problems that they are not to be approached without some humor and some bewilderment. -- Freeman Dyson
Reply to
Larry Jaques
The high pressure hose might be wire-reinforced and provide an alternate path to ground.
Reply to
Denis G.
Does the ground fault trip with no load on it at all?
If it does not, it means the washer is leaking to ground. That means
a) It wants to kill you. b) It's going to die soon anyhow; as the moter is shorting to ground.
You can bypass the GFI to get a) and b), if you live long enough.
Reply to
David Lesher

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.