high resistance plating

I'm looking for a company who specializes in plating copper onto high resistance conductors. The material I want to plate has about 100 ohms across a strip about 2 inches long. Does anyone have recommendations?

Thanks, Brendan

Reply to
Brendan Jones
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I'm looking for a company who specializes in plating copper onto high resistance conductors. The material I want to plate has about 100 ohms across a strip about 2 inches long. Does anyone have recommendations?

Thanks, Brendan

Reply to
Brendan Jones

Hi Brendan

Have you tried PCB manufactures? they plate through holes in non conductive boards all the time your task should be easy.

Peter

Reply to
Peter Kiproff

Not a problem. Just keep the current low until you have a "flash" of copper. Once flashed, it'll plate like a piece of metal.

You could also flash it with electroless tin, but I don't think it'll be necessary.

If you want to have it done, look for a place that plates flowers and baby shoes. One hit from Google:

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Reply to
Don Foreman

Hmm, I wonder if this process could be scaled up sufficiently apply a thick layer of copper plating to the bottom of a large boat? Antifouling, plus a barrier against figerglass blistering..=20

To reply, please remove one letter from each side of "@" Spammers are VERMIN. Please kill them all.

Reply to
Doug Warner

Float the boat in the acid and provide the current to drive the copper atoms to the boat and you can do it. The rest is time for how thick you want the copper coating to be. I'll note that it won't be cheap to float the boat nor the amount of power that you'll be needing to provide for the plating.

-- Why isn't there an Ozone Hole at the NORTH Pole?

Reply to
Bob May

Not a good idea. As the copper is slowly consumed (rusts), a portion of the effluent would be Cupric Chloride and/or Copper Sulphate, which are extremely toxic to living organisms.

Do they make a marine wax/applicant for this purpose?

Reply to
Mark Jones

And tributyl tin isn't ?

Reply to
Andy Dingley

Which is why they used it. Killed the barnacles, ship worms, etc. Kept the ships bottoms relatively clean.

Uncle George

Reply to
F. George McDuffee

Its mean stuff

I've had cupric sulphate on my arm at an old abandoned turn of the century mine. Itches worse than fiberglass insulation

Looks really beautiful when you see a pond of it makes the water look bluer than blue and still clear. (then i found out what it was AFTER)

Brent (Raised in a mining town where the ores had large amounts of Sulphur along witht he copper and nickel)

Reply to
Brent Philion

On Wed, 11 Jan 2006 22:42:10 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, Brent Philion quickly quoth:

She do tingle, don't she?

Try taking a bath in it. It's said to be like climbing down an active anthill naked. But once you rinse off, your poison ivy doesn't itch any more. I used some (1/4" copper sulphate crystal dissolved in a couple ounces of water) on my arm after a night's romp in the bushes at Bonsall Lake. I had 3 small bumps. The poor girl had it inside and out, all over her body. Both of us knew of its toxicity and survived its use. I wouldn't want to make a habit of it, but it sure keeps the oils from poison oak/ivy/sumac from spreading.

"Be the change you want to see in the world." --Mahatma Gandhi - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

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Reply to
Larry Jaques

I'm sure there's a story *there*.

Jim

Reply to
jim rozen

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