What is the purspose of pre-tinned wire?

Some insulated multistrnd copper wire is pre-tinned and a lot is not.
What is the purpose of pre-tinned wire? As far as I can see the
advantage is that the copper core doesn't oxidise which means the wire can be soldered or fixed to a terminate with only minimal cleaning.
Sounds like a good thing to me, so why isn't almost all wire pre- tinned?
Is cost really so different?
Does the tinning-coating replace where copper would have been in the overall wire and tinning is of higher reistence?
Is flexibility affected?
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Cost is part of it and now I am sure lead hysteria has something to do with it.
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:Some insulated multistrnd copper wire is pre-tinned and a lot is :not. : :What is the purpose of pre-tinned wire? As far as I can see the :advantage is that the copper core doesn't oxidise which means the :wire can be soldered or fixed to a terminate with only minimal :cleaning. : :Sounds like a good thing to me, so why isn't almost all wire pre- :tinned? : :Is cost really so different? : :Does the tinning-coating replace where copper would have been in :the overall wire and tinning is of higher reistence? : :Is flexibility affected?
As you surmised, the answer is cost. It is not the cost of the tin itself but the additional process and handling which adds to the complexity of production. The copper conductor wire gauge is not made smaller where tinning is not applied and the added few microns of tin would not affect resistance/unit length by any significant degree. Flexibility is not an issue.
I think that manufacturers realise the majority of termination methods used today rely on crimping or soldering while the copper conductors are clean. Tinned conductors are an advantage where the conductors are secured by screws or wire-wrap although less so for the latter. Insulation displacement techniques are not a problem for untinned conductors.
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On 17 Apr 04:49, Ross Herbert wrote:

Is it real "tin" that's used?
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Sandi wrote:

No, it is usually tin/lead alloy, better known as solder.
Cheers
ian
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On 4/17/2009 7:20 AM Ian Bell spake thus:

Not any more (post-RoHS). (Solder, yes, but not lead.)
--
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

Fortunately I stocked up on the real stuff before they banned it ;-)
Cheers
Ian
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wrote:

Sorry, but TPC wire was already RoHS compliant. All the idiots had to do is change the label. TIN is TIN. It doesn't say "SPC" (Solder PLated Wire)... It SAYS TPC TIN Plated Wire. Pretty simple.
SPC (Silver, of course) is better anyway... particularly from a shelf life POV.
I hate TPC wire that has been around too long. The crap won't even take solder. Give me SPC any day. The cost difference is negligible, if one weighs the added labor cost of dealing with poor quality TPC, which nearly all of it is.
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Mr. Haney wrote:

Tinned plated wire shouldn't have issues with solder how ever, electro plated may which is normally used more in cases of screw terminals and crimp fasteners.
http://webpages.charter.net/jamie_5 "
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On Fri, 17 Apr 2009 22:23:26 -0400, Jamie

Tin plated wire is notorious for NOT taking solder, especially when it is inside teflon.
An even worse type is HV wire that is TPC on PTFE. It is worth whatever the difference is to buy SPC, because THAT ALWAYS takes solder.
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On 18 Apr 03:49, Mr. Haney wrote:

Aren't these problems are surely to do with contamination of the wire plating by the insulation rather than inherent characteristics of the plating?
Worldclass Wire & Cable's catalogue has several charts comparing the properties of the insulation including one on fluoropolymers. However they don't seem to worry much about soldering probably because maybe they presume their users (usually military subcontractors) will clean the wire.
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Duh. That's what I said. "especially when it is inside teflon".

The FLUX 'cleans the wire' you dippy ditz.
The cases notes are where NORMAL soldering processes do NOT yield favorable results.
It is pretty obvious for anyone with an inkling of common sense.
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Mr. Haney wrote:

Well I suppose if you were to use the wire with in a normal time from the manufacturing date, you wouldn't need to use that flux would ya?
http://webpages.charter.net/jamie_5 "
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On Sat, 18 Apr 2009 20:57:12 -0400, Jamie

Solder comes with flux, you total idiot, and solder processes all use flux as well.
That borders on being one of the most stupid posts you have ever made, Jamie.
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On 19 Apr 02:39, Mr. Haney wrote:

Not sure I understand why this exchange got so lively. You wrote this:
"Tin plated wire is notorious for NOT taking solder, especially when it is inside teflon."
Assuming you wrote what you meant to write then you said "tin plated wire is notorious for NOT taking solder". You also added that furthermore it was even harder still to solder tin plated wire when it was inside Teflon insulation.
Aren't some posters responding to your clearly made statement that
"Tin plated wire is notorious for NOT taking solder"
because it probably seems a bit unexpected to them? I have to confess it does a bit unexpected to me too. It doesn't relate to my experience or known facts.
The Teflon insulation you mention is an additional observation which you offer as an extra fact but it's not particularly relevant to the OP's question.
Seems to me this discussion is based around your statement:
"Tin plated wire is notorious for NOT taking solder"
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wrote:

Folks in this discussion need to define "pre-tinned".
There is TPC wire, which is individual TIN plated Copper strands made into mutli-stranded wire in the same process as any other stranded wire.
There is SPC, which is individual Silver plated Copper strands.
It was always my understanding that "pre-tinned" wire was stranded wire that was run through a solder bath and tinned similarly as the 'tinning' one would give the end of a wire in a solder pot.
If the wire is this type, it is used in certain industries to reduce production labor costs. It is specifically NOT used in certain other industries due to the problems associated with cinched type termination processes and an effect known as 'solder creep'.
TPC is TIN plated, not solder plated. Just like it states.
"Pre-tinned wire" IS processed using solder.
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<snip>

Tin has a much lower conductivity than copper, and as RF travels on the surface of a conductor, it would attenuate RF and high frequency AC
Steve Terry
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Is that why most, but not all, teflon insulated wire was silver plated?
Chuck P.
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"Pilgrim"

** No.
Teflon coated wire intended is for high temp applications.
Silver has a much higher melting point than tin ( just a tad below copper) and is more corrosion resistant too.
..... Phil
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On Fri, 17 Apr 2009 22:35:39 +1000, "Phil Allison"

With the sole exclusion of anything related to a nuclear reactor.
Teflon turns to powder in that environment, and they (Genral Atomics)do not use it in such settings. You will see it used on the Predator, however.

Also, purified Silver Oxide, made in the lab, conducts better than the element itself does. Silver oxide on wires, and other conductive surfaces creates a protective 'patina' on the surfaces that are exposed to the air. In wiring, it does not affect the overall conductivity of the wire. In the lab, it is the top dog.
Most conductive element: Silver
Most conductive compound: Silver Oxide

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