Best wire crimper

DoN and Iggy tried to talk me into crimping my connectors on my just completed tractor project. I didn't listen this time because my
crimper is a total POS. So, I solder after crimp to reinforce. I can see the point about vibration killing this after time.
Anyway, I started looking for a better unit. There is a bewildering selection. I need to crimp terminals on #18 through #10 wire. Looks like I need dies or several tools. what's my best buy?
Karl
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Karl, if you do solder, solder JUST at the wire-tip end of the terminal's ferrule, then do a light crimp of the body of the ferrule onto the insulation of the wire, to help provide some strain-relief.
But crimping alone is best in a high-vibration environment...
So... AMP makes a line of ratchet-action crimpers with replacable dies that operate much like their coax and RJ(phone) connector crimpers.
You cannot accidently under-crimp or over-crimp a connector, assuming you use the correct wire size, ferrule size, and die.
The are pricey, but you'll likely never replace the tool, and they do perfect work.
LLoyd
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You need a ratcheting crimper with a die that has three holes for different sizes of wires. I have a version of this crimper:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber—420
Mine is not that crimper exactly, but looks similar, and I am satisfied with it. (just different handle color)
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wrote:

Those ratcheting crimpers work great.
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    What it is missing is the adjustment for crimping the insulation for different thicknesses of insulation. It is right only for a given thickness of insulation.
    Otherwise, it is a good crimper. (But AMP makes some of this design too -- a notch up from the cheapest ones -- which also are designed for shearing screws to length, a step down from the ones designed for P.I.D.G. terminals.)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

It is adjustable for insulation thickness BUT it isn't as easy as some. There is a wheel on the side with different notches to adjust crimp range.
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Karl Townsend wrote:

My vote would be for a Paladin crimp tool: http://www.paladin-tools.com /
I have the 8000 series CrimpALL and can't fault it at all. It's tougher than many crimp tools for which you'd spend three or four times the money.
The 8000 series frame is stronger than the 1300 series frame, and here in England they sell for about the same price. So the 8000 is the better deal. I got mine from http://www.farnell.com /.
Some crimp enthusiasts don't like Paladin tools. I'm really fussy about tools myself and I still don't understand why. The tool I bought is an incredibly durable tool, precisely made and not insanely priced. I can't see what's not to like about it.
You can check the dies available on Paladin's website which I mentioned above.
Best wishes,
Chris
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Christopher Tidy wrote:

By the way, it's a ratchet crimper. Somewhere I remember reading that it's designed to do a minimum of 50,000 crimps.
Chris
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On Thu, 26 Mar 2009 07:05:42 -0500, Karl Townsend

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber—420
There are probably better crimpers available (for much more $$$), but this one seems to work fine for me. It's miles better than the single-action pliers-like tools.
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OK, two votes. Guess I'll bite. I've had BAD experience with horrible freight and vowed to not purchase there again. I'll give them one more chance to change my opinion.
Karl
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The rule that I follow regarding Harbor Freight is: do not buy anything that needs sharp edges, and do not buy anything with any motors (electric or otherwise).
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wrote:

Ignoramus 764: You rule is the same one I was living by until my friend did a re-build on a 35' sail boat which involve much drilling of SS. He used a set of HF drills and I never saw him in the act of sharpening one. He claimed they worked great. Further I've been using the $19.95 4" and 4 1/2 " grinders. They seem bullet proof. If they quit it is only $19.95.
I sure like it better if my rules hold up longer.
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The HF drills that I bought were utter crap. They would melt in the hole, sort of, and leave such a hard residue that the only way to fix it was a carbide drill.
I have a set of Shars drills and those work OK.
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Stuart Fields wrote:

Melted the brushes out of my HF 4 1/2" grinder first time I used it.
Doug T
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wrote:

The orange grinders seem to hold up pretty well.
The other ones..are utter crap
Gunner, 4 orange HF grinders, all running ok "Human nature is bad. Good is a human product  A warped piece of wood must be steamed and forced before it is made straight; a metal blade must be put to the whetstone before it becomes sharp. Since the nature of people is bad, to become corrected they must be taught by teachers and to be orderly they must acquire ritual and moral principles." —Sun Tzu  
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Karl Townsend wrote:

Their digital calipers are a great deal as is their 0-3" micrometer set. Their new digital micrometer looks good as well, though I haven't personally used it... yet...
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And their Professional wrenches are rather good, as well.
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On Thu, 26 Mar 2009 12:47:12 -0500, the infamous Ignoramus764

I think you misspelled "Pittsburgh", Iggy, but they are reather good. I have a couple toolbags full of HF stuff and have found only a handful of bad tools in all of those.
Early on (I started buying from HF back in the early '70s), they had some really horrible crap, and you can see in the pictures that some of the stuff they sell is crap, but most of it has been well built. I'm still using some of the tools I bought from them 30 years ago.
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wrote:

Do not change your opinion of Harbor Freight. They sell crap, but also sell good tools. So evaluate your needs as whether you need a tool that will last a long time under regular useage, or do you need a tool for occasional use.
Then also evaluate the tool that HF sells. Some are good and some are not. If you can not see the tool at a local store, ask here if it is any good.
With some stores you can assume the quality is good. But with Harbor Freight, I assume that the tool will be at least worth what I paid ( provided it is on sale ).
A racheting crimper for $10 from HF or one from W.W. Grainger for $68.
Dan
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snipped-for-privacy@krl.org wrote:

Karl, only you know what kind of a guy you are when it comes to tools. Do you want a great tool, or do you want a cheap tool which nominally does the job (it won't be as good, pretty much guaranteed)?
If you want a quality tool, go with Paladin or AMP. If you want the cheap tool, go with Harbor Freight. You get what you pay for.
Best wishes,
Chris
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